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Admiral David D. Porter, The Naval History of the Civil War. 12 0 Browse Search
Benson J. Lossing, Pictorial Field Book of the Civil War. Volume 2. 12 0 Browse Search
Harper's Encyclopedia of United States History (ed. Benson Lossing) 8 0 Browse Search
Rebellion Record: a Diary of American Events: Documents and Narratives, Volume 4. (ed. Frank Moore) 6 0 Browse Search
Rebellion Record: a Diary of American Events: Documents and Narratives, Volume 3. (ed. Frank Moore) 6 0 Browse Search
Rebellion Record: a Diary of American Events: Documents and Narratives, Volume 8. (ed. Frank Moore) 6 0 Browse Search
General Horace Porter, Campaigning with Grant 4 0 Browse Search
Rebellion Record: a Diary of American Events: Documents and Narratives, Volume 5. (ed. Frank Moore) 4 0 Browse Search
The Photographic History of The Civil War: in ten volumes, Thousands of Scenes Photographed 1861-65, with Text by many Special Authorities, Volume 2: Two Years of Grim War. (ed. Francis Trevelyan Miller) 4 0 Browse Search
Horace Greeley, The American Conflict: A History of the Great Rebellion in the United States of America, 1860-65: its Causes, Incidents, and Results: Intended to exhibit especially its moral and political phases with the drift and progress of American opinion respecting human slavery from 1776 to the close of the War for the Union. Volume II. 2 0 Browse Search
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Browsing named entities in John Esten Cooke, Wearing of the Gray: Being Personal Portraits, Scenes, and Adventures of War.. You can also browse the collection for Conestoga (Pennsylvania, United States) or search for Conestoga (Pennsylvania, United States) in all documents.

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l the excitements of the moment. Breathed's fire, however, repulsed the charge; and as night drew on, Stuart set his column in motion — the wagons in the centre — toward Jefferson. One ludicrous scene at that moment I perfectly remember. A fat Dutchman who had been lounging about, and reconnoitring the strength, etc., of the Confederate force, was regarded as too well informed to be left behind with the enemy; and this worthy was accordingly requested to come along on the back of a huge Conestoga. This request he treated with calm disregard, when a cavalry-man made a tremendous blow at him, which caused him to mount in hot haste, with only a halter to guide his elephant. He had no sooner done so than the Conestoga ran off, descended the slope at full speed, bounded elephant-wise over an enormous ditchand it was only by clinging close with knees and hands that the Dutchman kept his seat. Altogether, the spectacle was one to tickle the ribs of death. The last I saw of the captive