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eneral Meade's army was put in motion, and at night was in position, its left at Emmittsburgh, and right at New-Windsor. The advance of Buford's cavalry was at Gettysburgh, and Kilpatrick's division at Hanover, where it encountered Stuart's cavalry, which had passed around the rear and right of our army without meeting any seriousconcentrated at Emmittsburgh, under General Reynolds, while the right wing moved up to Manchester. Buford reported the enemy in force on the Cashtown road near Gettysburgh, and Reynolds moved up to that place on the first of July. He found our cavalry warmly engaged with the enemy, and holding them in check on the Cashtown road. oads, compelled General Howard, upon whom the command devolved, to withdraw his force, the First and Eleventh corps, to the Cemetery ridge, on the south side of Gettysburgh. About seven P. M., Generals Sickles and Slocum arrived on the field with the Third and Twelfth corps, which took position, one on the left and the other on th
e. It is a source of great satisfaction to have been instrumental in accomplishing such magnificent and important results with so little loss, and I can only attribute it to the care of that Providence who spread the mantle of his protection over us; and the bold impetuosity of my brave men that bore down, and gave the enemy no time to rally their broken columns. To the officers and men of General Geary's war-worn division, the heroes around whose brows cluster the unfading laurels of Gettysburgh, we of the Cumberland extend a soldier's greeting and congratulation; they were our companions in storming Lookout, and the best testimonial we can give them of our appreciation of their bravery and endurance, is that we thought their valor and conduct worthy of our most energetic emulation. Walker C. Whitaker, Brigadier-General Commanding. Brigadier-General Hazen's report. headquarters Second brigade, Third division, Fourth corps, in camp, near Knoxville, Tenn., December 10, 18
Virginia, killed; General J. M. Jones, slightly wounded in head; Lieutenant-Colonel Coleston, Second Virginia, leg amputated; Major Terry, Fourth Virginia, slightly wounded; Lieutenant-Colonel Brown, First North-Carolina, slightly wounded; Colonel Nelligan, First Louisiana, severely wounded in the shoulder; Captain Merrick, General Halford's staff, severely in the face. The color-bearer of the First Louisiana was killed. I could not learn his name, but he is the same who was captured at Gettysburgh, and put his colors under his shirt and thus saved them, and afterward escaped. The country where the fighting occurred is densely wooded, and similar in every respect to the country about Chancellorsville, it being, indeed, but a continuation of that description of country. During the fight General Ed. Johnson had a horse shot under him, and General Stuart was slightly wounded, but soon resumed command. There was also some cavalry fighting at the upper fords on Friday, but it did
of those whom they held for exchange, and encampments of the surplus paroled prisoners delivered up by us were established in the United States, where the men were enabled to receive the comforts and solace of constant communication with their homes and families. In July last, the fortune of war again favored the enemy, and they were enabled to exchange for duty the men previously delivered to them, against those captured and paroled at Vicksburgh and Port Hudson. The prisoners taken at Gettysburgh, however, remained in their hands, and should have been returned to our lines on parole, to await exchange. Instead of executing a duty imposed by the plainest dictates of justice and good faith, pretexts were instantly sought for holding them in permanent captivity. General orders rapidly succeeded each other from the bureau at Washington, placing new constructions on an agreement which had given rise to no dispute while we retained the advantage in the number of prisoners. With a dis
General Buford's cavalry had advanced as far as Gettysburgh, and reported that the confederate army was debouigence General Reynolds was ordered to advance on Gettysburgh with the First and Eleventh corps, which he reachners — nearly four thousand--to the south side of Gettysburgh. His position was eminently critical, when, to tm, which accidentally fell into my hands: July 1, Gettysburgh. General Sickles: General Doubleday (First corpshe two armies was some fifteen miles distant from Gettysburgh, where fate willed that it should occur. Whetherthe lamented Reynolds before he became engaged at Gettysburgh it is difficult to say. It could not have failed states, at eleven P. M. on Wednesday, and reached Gettysburgh at one A. M. Thursday, July second. Early in theg our position on the left gave us the victory at Gettysburgh; and yet General Meade, not having sufficiently e an eye-witness. When General Sickles arrived at Gettysburgh, General Howard was not the commanding officer, a
ntagious diseases; the last morsel of food has been taken from families, who are not allowed to carry on a trade or branch of industry; a rigid and offensive espionage has been introduced to ferret out disloyalty; persons have been forced to choose between starvation of helpless children and taking the oath of allegiance to a hated government. The cartel for the exchange of prisoners has been suspended, and our unfortunate soldiers subjected to the grossest indignities. The wounded at Gettysburgh were deprived of their nurses and inhumanly left to perish on the field. Helpless women have been exposed to the most cruel outrages and to that dishonor which is infinitely worse than death. Citizens have been murdered by the Butlers and McNeils and Milroys, who are favorite generals of our enemies. Refined and delicate ladies have been seized, bound with cords, imprisoned, guarded by negroes, and held as hostages for the return of recaptured slaves. Unoffending non-combatants have b
ng a rebel horse and leaving the field on its back. Colonel Brisbin lost his trunk, in the baggage train, the sash taken from General Barksdale on the field at Gettysburgh, which had been made a present to him, and General Villipigue's sabre, taken from him in Virginia. Colonel Robinson, while defending the wagontrain on the fieral Lee's staff, lost some five hundred dollars' worth of clothing and money, together with the sash worn by the rebel General Barksdale, which was captured at Gettysburgh, and a valuable sword also captured near Gettysburgh. It is ascertained that our dead who were left on the field between Pleasant Hill and Sabine Cross-RoadsGettysburgh. It is ascertained that our dead who were left on the field between Pleasant Hill and Sabine Cross-Roads, were buried by the enemy, and that the wounded were conveyed to Mansfield the night after the battle, where they were carefully attended. Colonel Emerson commanding a brigade of Landrum's division, was wounded. Lieutenant-Colonel Kreb, Eighty-seventh Illinois mounted infantry, when the confusion in our retiring lines was th