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P. Ovidius Naso, Art of Love, Remedy of Love, Art of Beauty, Court of Love, History of Love, Amours (ed. various) 12 0 Browse Search
C. Suetonius Tranquillus, The Lives of the Caesars (ed. Alexander Thomson) 10 0 Browse Search
P. Ovidius Naso, Metamorphoses (ed. Arthur Golding) 10 0 Browse Search
P. Ovidius Naso, Metamorphoses (ed. Brookes More) 4 0 Browse Search
C. Suetonius Tranquillus, The Lives of the Caesars (ed. Alexander Thomson) 2 0 Browse Search
T. Maccius Plautus, Rudens, or The Fisherman's Rope (ed. Henry Thomas Riley) 2 0 Browse Search
M. Tullius Cicero, Orations, The fourteen orations against Marcus Antonius (Philippics) (ed. C. D. Yonge) 2 0 Browse Search
P. Ovidius Naso, Art of Love, Remedy of Love, Art of Beauty, Court of Love, History of Love, Amours (ed. various) 2 0 Browse Search
Titus Livius (Livy), History of Rome, books 1-10 (ed. Rev. Canon Roberts) 2 0 Browse Search
Q. Horatius Flaccus (Horace), Odes (ed. John Conington) 2 0 Browse Search
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Browsing named entities in P. Ovidius Naso, Art of Love, Remedy of Love, Art of Beauty, Court of Love, History of Love, Amours (ed. various). You can also browse the collection for Mars (Pennsylvania, United States) or search for Mars (Pennsylvania, United States) in all documents.

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y verse, receive my soul. Should sense, and wit, and art refuse to join In all I write, and fail my great design, Yet with such passion shall my lines be crown'd, And so much softness in my poem found, Such moving tenderness, the world shall see, Love could have been describ'd by none but me. Let Dryden from his works with justice claim Immortal praise! I from my sacred flame Draw all my glory, challenge all my fame. Believe me, Delia, lovers have their wars, And Cupid has his camp as well as Mars. That age which suits a soldier best, will prove The fittest for the sharp fatigues of love; None but young men the toils of war can bear, None but young men can serve and please the fair; Youth with the foe maintains the vig'rous fight, Youth gives the longing maid the full delight. On either hand like hardship it sustains, Great are the soldier's, great the lover's pains. Th' event of war no gen'ral can foreknow, And that, alas! of love is doubtful too. In various fields, whatever chance sh
P. Ovidius Naso, Art of Love, Remedy of Love, Art of Beauty, Court of Love, History of Love, Amours (ed. various), Elegy IX: Of Love and War. By Henry Cromwell. (search)
Elegy IX: Of Love and War. By Henry Cromwell. Trust me, my Atticus, in love are wars; And Cupid has his camp, as well as Mars: The age that's fit for war best suits with love, The old in both unserviceable prove, Infirm in war, and impotent in love. The soldiers which a general does require, Are such as ladies would in bed desire: Who but a soldier, and a lover, can Bear the night's cold, in show'rs of hail and rain? One in continual watch his station keeps, Or on the earth in broken slumbers sleeps; The other takes his still repeated round By mistress' house — then lodges on the ground. Soldiers, and lovers, with a careful eye, Observe the motions of the enemy: One to the walls makes his approach in form, Pushes the siege, and takes the town by storm: The other lays his close to Celia's fort, Presses his point, and gains the wish'd-for port. As soldiers, when the foe securely lies In sleep, and wine dissolv'd, the camp surprise; So when the jealous to their rest remove, And all is
P. Ovidius Naso, Art of Love, Remedy of Love, Art of Beauty, Court of Love, History of Love, Amours (ed. various), Elegy V: To His False Mistress. By Eusden. (search)
k supplied. The silent speech too well I understood, For to deceive a lover yet who could? Tho' thou didst write in a laconic hand, And words for sentences were taught to stand. Now ended was the treat, and ev'ry guest Indulg'd his ease, and lay compos'd to rest: Your close, lascivious kisses then I spied, And something more than lips to lips applied; Such from a sister brothers ne'er receive, But yielding fair ones to warm lovers give. Not so Diana would to Phoebus press, But Cytherea so her Mars would bless. Too far provok'd, at last I cried aloud, "On whom are pleasures, due to me, bestow'd? I must not, will not, cannot bear this sight; 'Tis lawful, sure, to seize upon my right. These raptures to us both in common are, But whence, ye furies, claims a third his share?" Enrag'd I spoke, and o'er her cheeks were spread Swift newborn glories in a sudden red; Such blushes on the bridal night adorn The trembling virgin; such the rising morn. So sweet a hue the lab'ring Cynthia shows, Or t
P. Ovidius Naso, Art of Love, Remedy of Love, Art of Beauty, Court of Love, History of Love, Amours (ed. various), Elegy XIV: To his Mistress, who endeavoured to make herself miscarry. (search)
ell as sight they fain would please, And the womb early of its burden ease. Had woman sooner known this wicked trade, Among the race of men what havock had they made. Mankind had been extinct, and lost the seed, Without a wonder to restore the breed, As when Deucalion and his Purrha hurl'd The stones that sow'd with men the delug'd world, Had Thetis, goddess of the sea, refus'd To bear the burden, and her fruit abus'd, Who would have Priam's royal seat destroy'd? Or had the vestal whom fierce Mars enjoy'd, Stifled the twins within her pergnant womb, What founder would have then been born to Rome? Had Venus, when she with Aeneas teem'd, To death, ere born, Anchises' son condemn'd, The world had of the Caesars been depriv'd; Augustus ne'er had reign'd, nor Julius liv'd. And thou, whose beauty is the boast of fame, Hadst perish'd, had thy mother done the same; Nor had I liv'd love's faithful slave to be, Had my own mother dealt as ill by me. Ah, vile invention, ah, accurs'd design, To rob
P. Ovidius Naso, Art of Love, Remedy of Love, Art of Beauty, Court of Love, History of Love, Amours (ed. various), Elegy XVIII: To Macer, blaming him for not writing of love as he did. (search)
, that Sabinus, my departed friend, Could from all quarters now his answers send! Ulysses' hand should to his queen be known, And wretched Phaedra hear from Theseus' son; Dido Aeneas' answer should receive, And Phillis Demophoon's, if alive; Jason should to Hypsipyle return A sad reply, and Sappho cease to mourn: Nor him whom she can ne'er possess, desire, But give to Phoebus fane her votive lyre. As much as you in lofty epics deal, You, Macer, show that you love's passion feel, And sensible of beauty's powerful charm, You hear their call amid the noise of arms. A place for Paris in your verse we find, And Helen's to the young adult'rer kind; There lovely Laodamia mourns her lord, The first that fell by Hector's fatal sword. If well I know you, and your mind can tell, The theme's as grateful, and you like as well To tune your lyre for Cupid as for Mars, And Thracian combats change for Paphian wars; If well I know you, and your works design Your will, you often quit your camp for mine.
P. Ovidius Naso, Art of Love, Remedy of Love, Art of Beauty, Court of Love, History of Love, Amours (ed. various), Elegy II: To his Mistress at the horse-race. By Henry Cromwell. (search)
e ran, What rapt'rous wishes seiz'd Menalion I burn'd and rag'd before -- what then are these, But flames on flames, and waters to the seas? By these a thousand other charms are guess'd, Which are so advantageously suppress'd. Oh for some air! this scorching heat remove, Your fan would do't, but 'tis the heat of love." But now the pomp appears, the sacred throng Command applauses from the heart and tongue; First victory with expanded wings does move, Be near, O Goddess ! to assist my love; To Mars let warriors acclamations raise, The merchants' tongues resound with Neptune's praise; Whilst I, whom neither seas nor arms invite, In love alone, the fruit of peace, delight; To their Apollo let the prophets pray, And hunters to Diana homage pay. Let the mechanics to Minerva vow, Rustics to Ceres, and to Bacchus bow; Whilst I devote myself to thee alone, Kind Venus, and the pow'rful god thy son; 0 be propitious to my enterprize, Inform with all thy softness these fair eyes, And to love's cau
P. Ovidius Naso, Art of Love, Remedy of Love, Art of Beauty, Court of Love, History of Love, Amours (ed. various), Elegy III: Of His Perjured Mistress. By Henry Cromwell. (search)
oncern'd you see (Vain witnesses for truth, for faith, for me,) Such an affront put on divinity, Yet no revenge the daring crime pursue, But the deceiv'd must be her victim too? Either the gods are empty notions, crept Into the minds of sleepers as they slept, In vain are fear'd, are but the tricks of law, To keep the foolish cred'lous world in awe; Or, if there be a god, he loves the fair, And all things at their sole disposal are. For us are all the instruments of war Design'd, the sword of Mars, and Pallas' spear; 'Gainst us alone Apollo's bows are bent, And at our hands Jove's brandish'd thunder sent. Yet of the ladies, oh ! how fond are they ! Dare not the inj'ries they receive, repay, But those who ought to fear them they obey. Jove to his votaries is most severe; Temples nor altars does his lightning spare. Obliging Semele in flames expires, But those who merit, can escape the fires. Is this the justice of your pow'rs divine? Who then will offer incense at a shrine ? Why do we t