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The documents where this entity occurs most often are shown below. Click on a document to open it.

Document Max. Freq Min. Freq
T. Maccius Plautus, Rudens, or The Fisherman's Rope (ed. Henry Thomas Riley) 42 0 Browse Search
Lucretius, De Rerum Natura (ed. William Ellery Leonard) 26 0 Browse Search
P. Ovidius Naso, Art of Love, Remedy of Love, Art of Beauty, Court of Love, History of Love, Amours (ed. various) 16 0 Browse Search
P. Ovidius Naso, Metamorphoses (ed. Brookes More) 6 0 Browse Search
P. Ovidius Naso, Art of Love, Remedy of Love, Art of Beauty, Court of Love, History of Love, Amours (ed. various) 6 0 Browse Search
C. Suetonius Tranquillus, The Lives of the Caesars (ed. Alexander Thomson) 4 0 Browse Search
P. Ovidius Naso, Art of Love, Remedy of Love, Art of Beauty, Court of Love, History of Love, Amours (ed. various) 4 0 Browse Search
T. Maccius Plautus, Asinaria, or The Ass-Dealer (ed. Henry Thomas Riley) 2 0 Browse Search
P. Ovidius Naso, Metamorphoses (ed. Arthur Golding) 2 0 Browse Search
Q. Horatius Flaccus (Horace), Odes (ed. John Conington) 2 0 Browse Search
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Browsing named entities in P. Ovidius Naso, Metamorphoses (ed. Brookes More). You can also browse the collection for Venus (Pennsylvania, United States) or search for Venus (Pennsylvania, United States) in all documents.

Your search returned 3 results in 3 document sections:

P. Ovidius Naso, Metamorphoses (ed. Brookes More), Book 3, line 95 (search)
nd likewise he who cast that dart was slain: both breathing forth their lives upon the air so briefly theirs, expired together. All as if demented leaped in sudden rage, each on the other, dealing mutual wounds. So, having lived the space allotted them, the youthful warriors perished as they smote the earth (their blood-stained mother) with their breasts: and only five of all the troop remained; of whom Echion, by Minerva warned, called on his brothers to give up the fight, and cast his arms away in pledge of faith.— when Cadmus, exiled from Sidonia's gates, builded the city by Apollo named, these five were trusted comrades in his toil. Now Thebes is founded, who can deem thy days unhappy in shine exile, Cadmus? Thou, the son-in-law of Mars and Venus; thou, whose glorious wife has borne to shine embrace daughters and sons? And thy grandchildren join around thee, almost grown to man's estate.— nor should we say, “He leads a happy life,” Till after death the funeral rites are
P. Ovidius Naso, Metamorphoses (ed. Brookes More), Book 9, line 418 (search)
When Themis, prophesying future days, had said these words, the Gods of Heaven complained because they also could not grant the gift of youth to many others in this way. Aurora wept because her husband had white hair; and Ceres then bewailed the age of her Iasion, grey and stricken old; and Mulciber demanded with new life his Erichthonius might again appear; and Venus, thinking upon future days, said old Anchises' years must be restored. And every god preferred some favorite, until vexed with the clamor, Jupiter implored, “If you can have regard for me, consider the strange blessings you desire: does any one of you believe he can prevail against the settled will of Fate? As Iolaus has returned by fate, to those years spent by him; so by the Fates Callirhoe's sons from infancy must grow to manhood with no struggle on their part, or force of their ambition. And you should endure your fortune with contented minds: I, also, must give all control to Fate. “If I had power to change the c
P. Ovidius Naso, Metamorphoses (ed. Brookes More), Book 15, line 745 (search)
wrought of brass and solid iron with vast labor, are unchangeable through all eternity; and have no weakening fears of thunder-shocks from heaven, nor from the rage of lightnings they are perfectly secure from all destruction. You will surely find the destinies of your descendants there, engraved in everlasting adamant. 'Tis certain. I myself, have read them there: and I, with care have marked them in my mind. I will repeat them so that you may have unerring knowledge of those future days. “Venus, the man on whose behalf you are so anxious, already has completed his alloted time. The years are ended which he owed to life on earth. You with his son, who now as heir to his estate must bear the burden of that government, will cause him, as a deity, to reach the heavens, and to be worshipped in the temples here. “The valiant son will plan revenge on those who killed his father and will have our aid in all his battles. The defeated walls of scarred Mutina, which he will besiege, shall sue