hide Matching Documents

The documents where this entity occurs most often are shown below. Click on a document to open it.

Document Max. Freq Min. Freq
Alfred Roman, The military operations of General Beauregard in the war between the states, 1861 to 1865 96 0 Browse Search
Rebellion Record: a Diary of American Events: Documents and Narratives, Volume 10. (ed. Frank Moore) 32 0 Browse Search
Southern Historical Society Papers, Volume 3. (ed. Reverend J. William Jones) 30 0 Browse Search
Brigadier-General Ellison Capers, Confederate Military History, a library of Confederate States Military History: Volume 5, South Carolina (ed. Clement Anselm Evans) 29 1 Browse Search
Southern Historical Society Papers, Volume 1. (ed. Reverend J. William Jones) 15 1 Browse Search
Frederick H. Dyer, Compendium of the War of the Rebellion: Regimental Histories 14 0 Browse Search
William Tecumseh Sherman, Memoirs of General William T. Sherman . 12 0 Browse Search
Southern Historical Society Papers, Volume 26. (ed. Reverend J. William Jones) 10 0 Browse Search
Emilio, Luis F., History of the Fifty-Fourth Regiment of Massachusetts Volunteer Infantry , 1863-1865 9 1 Browse Search
Horace Greeley, The American Conflict: A History of the Great Rebellion in the United States of America, 1860-65: its Causes, Incidents, and Results: Intended to exhibit especially its moral and political phases with the drift and progress of American opinion respecting human slavery from 1776 to the close of the War for the Union. Volume II. 7 1 Browse Search
View all matching documents...

Browsing named entities in Fitzhugh Lee, General Lee. You can also browse the collection for Coosawhatchie, S. C. (South Carolina, United States) or search for Coosawhatchie, S. C. (South Carolina, United States) in all documents.

Your search returned 3 results in 1 document section:

Fitzhugh Lee, General Lee, Chapter 7: Atlantic coast defenses.-assigned to duty in Richmond as commander in chief under the direction of the Southern President. (search)
ence in that department was permanently restored, and with it came to Lee a new accession of popularity and esteem. His headquarters was wisely established at Coosawhatchie on the railroad, a point midway between Charleston, S. C., and Savannah, Ga., and from which he could give close supervision to the defenses of these important cities. From this point, referring to the union of his family on Christmas day, he writes: Coosawhatchie, S. C., December 22, 1861. I shall think of you on that holy day more intensely than usual, and shall pray to the great God of heaven to shower his blessings upon you in this world and to unite you all in his courts in t would be vindicated, both to his own renown and the glory of his country. On February 8, 1862, he writes his wife from Savannah: I wrote you the day I left Coosawhatchie. I have been here ever since endeavoring to push forward the works for the defense of the city. Guns are scarce as well as ammunition. I shall have to bring