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Emilio, Luis F., History of the Fifty-Fourth Regiment of Massachusetts Volunteer Infantry , 1863-1865 40 2 Browse Search
Alfred Roman, The military operations of General Beauregard in the war between the states, 1861 to 1865 24 0 Browse Search
Frederick H. Dyer, Compendium of the War of the Rebellion: Regimental Histories 19 1 Browse Search
William F. Fox, Lt. Col. U. S. V., Regimental Losses in the American Civil War, 1861-1865: A Treatise on the extent and nature of the mortuary losses in the Union regiments, with full and exhaustive statistics compiled from the official records on file in the state military bureaus and at Washington 14 2 Browse Search
The Daily Dispatch: July 18, 1864., [Electronic resource] 12 0 Browse Search
Daniel Ammen, Confederate Military History, a library of Confederate States Military History: Volume 7.2, The Atlantic Coast (ed. Clement Anselm Evans) 10 0 Browse Search
Southern Historical Society Papers, Volume 26. (ed. Reverend J. William Jones) 8 0 Browse Search
Southern Historical Society Papers, Volume 29. (ed. Reverend J. William Jones) 8 0 Browse Search
Brigadier-General Ellison Capers, Confederate Military History, a library of Confederate States Military History: Volume 5, South Carolina (ed. Clement Anselm Evans) 7 1 Browse Search
The Daily Dispatch: April 4, 1863., [Electronic resource] 6 0 Browse Search
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Browsing named entities in Southern Historical Society Papers, Volume 25. (ed. Reverend J. William Jones). You can also browse the collection for John's Island, S. C. (South Carolina, United States) or search for John's Island, S. C. (South Carolina, United States) in all documents.

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Southern Historical Society Papers, Volume 25. (ed. Reverend J. William Jones), The career of Wise's Brigade, 1861-5. (search)
ge was too honest and real not to assign his apparent indifference to danger to the true cause, his deafness. But there was a much greater and more important instance trying the promptness and the pluck of these men. The enemy designed its attack upon Florida, and a large fleet left the mouth of the Stono, conveying troops for the South. It was uncertain for a time what their point of destination was, when a servant of General Gilmer was captured by my Rebel Troop, as it was called, on John's Island. He was brought in to me as a prisoner of war. He was a light mulatto, who described himself as the son of a slave freed by the Barnes family, near Frederick, in Maryland. He was General Gilmer's cook, was purveying for the general's table on Morris's Island, and had got lost on the Wadmalaw. He was an exceedingly plausible fellow, and after a close and searching examination professed to be wholly ignorant of the design of the Stono expedition. At last he was overcome by my refusal t