Browsing named entities in Rebellion Record: a Diary of American Events: Documents and Narratives, Volume 8. (ed. Frank Moore). You can also browse the collection for Ridgeville (South Carolina, United States) or search for Ridgeville (South Carolina, United States) in all documents.

Your search returned 2 results in 2 document sections:

ire to their fort and escaped to the mountains when we approached. The next day we invested Burlington, where the Yankees had constructed a fort impregnable to an enemy armed with merely small arms. Here again they set fire to their fort and took to the woods. We succeeded, however, in capturing fifteen or twenty of them. General Lee then sent his cattle and disabled men toward Romney, and with the rest of his command, now reduced to little over four hundred men, proceeded toward Ridgeville, where he encamped. The next morning, at four o'clock, we took up the line of march for New-Creek, but by the time we reached the top of Nobby Mountain, within seven miles of New-Creek, the weather became so intolerable that we turned back, and coming on through Romney, thence through gorges and over mountains of ice, toiling for several days, we reached the valley. The object of the expedition was, I believe, to get cattle. Six hundred of these and about three hundred horses, thirty
tance of Colonel Mulligan. While Fitzsimmons's and Thompson's troops were marching toward Romney, a cavalry force was despatched to look after rebel movements in the neighborhood of Leesburgh and in the Loudon County district, it having been rumored that a rebel force was moving and operating in that neighborhood. On Saturday night, the thirtieth, Colonel Thoburn, finding the enemy about to attack him in force at Petersburgh, Hardy County, evacuated his position there, and escaped to Ridgeville, where he joined a detachment of Colonel Mulligan's troops, and afterward moved with Mulligan to attack Early, near Moorfield. How Thoburn outwitted the enemy, who thought he had Thoburn penned in, has been partially explained in a previous despatch to the Herald. Let it suffice that I now say he got away with better success than we anticipated, and that his strategic movement over the mountains and far away is looked upon in the light of a very commendable feat. Having got Thoburn all