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Admiral David D. Porter, The Naval History of the Civil War. 82 0 Browse Search
Benson J. Lossing, Pictorial Field Book of the Civil War. Volume 1. 70 0 Browse Search
Robert Underwood Johnson, Clarence Clough Buell, Battles and Leaders of the Civil War: The Opening Battles. Volume 1. 58 0 Browse Search
John G. Nicolay, The Outbreak of Rebellion 48 0 Browse Search
Robert Underwood Johnson, Clarence Clough Buell, Battles and Leaders of the Civil War. Volume 4. 36 0 Browse Search
Horace Greeley, The American Conflict: A History of the Great Rebellion in the United States of America, 1860-65: its Causes, Incidents, and Results: Intended to exhibit especially its moral and political phases with the drift and progress of American opinion respecting human slavery from 1776 to the close of the War for the Union. Volume I. 24 0 Browse Search
Brigadier-General Ellison Capers, Confederate Military History, a library of Confederate States Military History: Volume 5, South Carolina (ed. Clement Anselm Evans) 24 6 Browse Search
Rebellion Record: a Diary of American Events, Diary from December 17, 1860 - April 30, 1864 (ed. Frank Moore) 16 0 Browse Search
Horace Greeley, The American Conflict: A History of the Great Rebellion in the United States of America, 1860-65: its Causes, Incidents, and Results: Intended to exhibit especially its moral and political phases with the drift and progress of American opinion respecting human slavery from 1776 to the close of the War for the Union. Volume II. 16 0 Browse Search
Emilio, Luis F., History of the Fifty-Fourth Regiment of Massachusetts Volunteer Infantry , 1863-1865 14 2 Browse Search
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Browsing named entities in Robert Underwood Johnson, Clarence Clough Buell, Battles and Leaders of the Civil War. Volume 4.. You can also browse the collection for Sumterville (South Carolina, United States) or search for Sumterville (South Carolina, United States) in all documents.

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Robert Underwood Johnson, Clarence Clough Buell, Battles and Leaders of the Civil War. Volume 4., chapter 1.1 (search)
instructions, But I consider also that the attack on Sumter, whenever it takes place, will probably be made at long rag's Point, within close range, to batter down the gorge of Sumter and endeavor to blow up the magazines. That mode of athells, and fragments. . . . The casualties are slight. At Sumter five men were wounded by fragments of masonry and wood. . done to our works and to strengthen the weakened walls of Sumter, whose disarmament was carefully carried on at night, in vke its place. The result of the seven days bombardment of Sumter was to convert that historic fort into a confused mass of g force and taken, and on the 1st of September the fire on Sumter was so intense as to effect its virtual destruction. The est heroism. And it is history to say that the defense of Sumter and Wagner are feats of war unsurpassed in ancient or modeew. The possession of Morris Island and the demolition of Sumter by the Federal land and naval forces were mere incidents i
Robert Underwood Johnson, Clarence Clough Buell, Battles and Leaders of the Civil War. Volume 4., Du Pont's attack at Charleston. (search)
cabin of the Ironsides and sat at the table where the admiral had already taken his seat. Each captain then told the story of his ship, its action and its condition, and when they had done, Admiral Du Pont went to his state-room and, having already given his orders to his staff, he was seen no more that night. The approaching darkness, and the difficulties presented by the outer obstructions in the channel, had decided Admiral Du Pont to defer the attempt to reach the city or pass inside Sumter until the following morning should give him a long day for such serious work. Before the morning came, he had learned the crippled condition of his iron-clad ships, and had become convinced that the force given him could not accomplish the end desired. His effort, therefore, on the evening of the 7th of April, may be looked upon as a reconnoissance in force, showing that the plan he had formed for the capture of Charleston was impracticable. During the war there had been instances of si
Robert Underwood Johnson, Clarence Clough Buell, Battles and Leaders of the Civil War. Volume 4., The boat attack on Sumter. (search)
The boat attack on Sumter. by Thomas H. Stevens, Rea]1-Admiral, U. S. N. By July 10th, 1863, a combined mons across the channel-way, two hundred yards above Sumter, as the admiral was desirous of learning if there wom shallow water at a point two hundred yards above Sumter, in a northeasterly direction, to the shoals on theen it is remembered that, since the first attack on Sumter by Du Pont, no demonstration had been made, except e enemy's iron-clads and batteries above and around Sumter, being unmolested and beyond our reach, would severme that one division of boats should be sent around Sumter as a feint, while the remainder should wait within ting the result of our demonstration. As we neared Sumter we were hailed loudly by the enemy, but no answer wapproaches to the gorge. The parapets and crown of Sumter were The boat attack on Fort Sumter. filled wit enemy would doubtless make a demonstration against Sumter. Our impression to this effect was strengthened by