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Admiral David D. Porter, The Naval History of the Civil War. 82 0 Browse Search
Benson J. Lossing, Pictorial Field Book of the Civil War. Volume 1. 70 0 Browse Search
Robert Underwood Johnson, Clarence Clough Buell, Battles and Leaders of the Civil War: The Opening Battles. Volume 1. 58 0 Browse Search
John G. Nicolay, The Outbreak of Rebellion 48 0 Browse Search
Robert Underwood Johnson, Clarence Clough Buell, Battles and Leaders of the Civil War. Volume 4. 36 0 Browse Search
Horace Greeley, The American Conflict: A History of the Great Rebellion in the United States of America, 1860-65: its Causes, Incidents, and Results: Intended to exhibit especially its moral and political phases with the drift and progress of American opinion respecting human slavery from 1776 to the close of the War for the Union. Volume I. 24 0 Browse Search
Brigadier-General Ellison Capers, Confederate Military History, a library of Confederate States Military History: Volume 5, South Carolina (ed. Clement Anselm Evans) 24 6 Browse Search
Rebellion Record: a Diary of American Events, Diary from December 17, 1860 - April 30, 1864 (ed. Frank Moore) 16 0 Browse Search
Horace Greeley, The American Conflict: A History of the Great Rebellion in the United States of America, 1860-65: its Causes, Incidents, and Results: Intended to exhibit especially its moral and political phases with the drift and progress of American opinion respecting human slavery from 1776 to the close of the War for the Union. Volume II. 16 0 Browse Search
Emilio, Luis F., History of the Fifty-Fourth Regiment of Massachusetts Volunteer Infantry , 1863-1865 14 2 Browse Search
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Browsing named entities in Admiral David D. Porter, The Naval History of the Civil War.. You can also browse the collection for Sumterville (South Carolina, United States) or search for Sumterville (South Carolina, United States) in all documents.

Your search returned 41 results in 6 document sections:

Admiral David D. Porter, The Naval History of the Civil War., Chapter 2: bombardment and fall of Fort Sumter.--destruction of the Norfolk Navy Yard by the Federal officers. (search)
e first shot and shell in silence; the batteries at regular intervals continued to belch forth their deadly missiles, and still no answer was returned by the besieged, until about an hour after the firing commenced, then two shots were fired from Sumter and glanced harmlessly from the face of Fort Moultrie. Sumter fired no more until between six and seven o'clock when, as if enraged at the onslaught made upon it and kept up with increasing vigor, it then opened from casemate and parapet a hail thern section of the country growing more prosperous and more happy under free labor and equal rights for all those who live in the South. In another generation people will likely bless the day when James Island and Moultrie opened their guns on Sumter, and caused to be wiped out that dark blotch on our escutcheon, which the whole world were pointing at and asking us how we could call ourselves a free country while four millions of people were held in bondage. Who knows what we might have been
Admiral David D. Porter, The Naval History of the Civil War., Chapter 10: naval engagement at South-West pass.--the Gulf blockading squadron in November, 1861. (search)
hich the National Government might send against Charleston. The commander at Sumter, if he was not ordered to remain supine under all provocations, was at least giurrectionists in Charleston were openly constructing strong earthworks opposite Sumter, avowedly with the intention of forcing its surrender, yet no steps were taken erplexing state of affairs that ever beset a statesman. The little garrison at Sumter was surrounded by guns, and the indignant people of the North were demanding thard up Charleston harbor and the smoke from the batteries which had opened upon Sumter was distinctly visible. Fox then turned and stood towards the Pawnee, intendintheir numbers, and making preparations to bombard the fort, as had been done at Sumter. Pensacola, with its well-equipped Navy Yard, was too tempting a bait for thhority attempted to show that the Fort Pickens expedition caused the failure at Sumter. There was no necessity for making an excuse for the Secretary of the Navy, Mr
Admiral David D. Porter, The Naval History of the Civil War., Chapter 33: (search)
ttery Gregg, Battery Wagner, etc. These defences were so placed that a vessel attempting to pass Sumter would be under a cross-fire from them all. every fort being armed with the heaviest and most destate the accuracy of the fire of those vessels. One hundred and twenty-four shots were fired at Sumter, and during the engagement the Monitors had to be kept in position to preserve their range underhem. The Confederate accounts state that fifty-five of the Monitors' shot struck the walls of Sumter, and others struck inside the works, which was excellent practice considering the situation. Thhe Naval historian labors in all this to show that there was wanting the energy in the attack on Sumter which characterized subsequent proceedings; but it must be remembered that Rear-Admiral Dahlgrens intense anxiety in regard to your operations. This day is the anniversary of the assault on Sumter, and God grant that its recurrence may witness the destruction of that fortress by our naval for
Admiral David D. Porter, The Naval History of the Civil War., Chapter 36: operations of the South Atlantic Squadron under Rear-Admiral Dahlgren, 1863.--operations in Charleston harbor, etc. (search)
found in the chapter entitled, First attack on Sumter. A squadron, making an attack on the Morris on that island, to assist in the reduction of Sumter, and, as this was a task requiring engineeringf over twenty feet. Its air-line distance from Sumter was one and three-quarter miles, and from Batt the rear of this parallel. Its distance from Sumter was 3,350 yards. The third parallel was 100 yay had demonstrated the feasibility of reaching Sumter and inflicting serious damage on the work; theharleston, August 24th. The enemy's fire on Sumter slackened to-day. The fleet has not participa making the most assiduous efforts to get into Sumter by the way of Wagner and Gregg, they overlookeich the fleet would be exposed, even as far as Sumter, which fort might or might not still have gunsd, if possible, pass the obstructions north of Sumter. Moultrie, Battery Bee and Fort Beauregard qurtheless determined to make a naval assault on Sumter on the night of September 8th. The suppositio[13 more...]
Admiral David D. Porter, The Naval History of the Civil War., Chapter 47: operations of South Atlantic Blockading Squadron, under Rear-admiral Dahlgren, during latter end of 1863 and in 1864. (search)
head. Aug. 2. Wagner Ottawa. Marblehead. Aug. 4. Wagner Montauk, Marblehead. Aug. 6. Wagner Marblehead. Aug. 8. Wagner Ottawa, Mahaska, Marblehead. Aug. 11. Wagner and vicinity Patapsco, Catskill. Aug. 13. Morris Island Dai Ching, Ottawa, Mahaska, Racer, Wissahickon. Aug. 14. Morris Island Wissahickon, Mahaska, Dan Smith, Ottawa, Dai Ching, Racer. Aug. 15. Wagner Racer, Dan Smith. Aug. 17. Batteries on Morris Island to direct fire from the batteries which opened on Sumter. Weehawken, Ironsides, Montauk, Nahant, Catskill, Passaic, Patapsco, Canandaigua Mahaska, Ottawa, Cimmaron, Wissahickon, Dai Ching, Lodona. Aug. 18. Wagner, to prevent assault Ironsides, Passaic, Weehawken, Wissahickon, Mahaska, Dai Ching, Ottawa, Lodona. Aug. 19. Wagner Ironsides. Aug. 20. Morris Island Ironsides, Mahaska, Ottawa, Dai Ching, Lodona. Aug. 21. Sumter and Wagner Ironsides, Patapsco, Mahaska, Dai Ching. Aug. 22. Wagner Weehawken, Ironsides, Montauk. Aug. 23. S
Admiral David D. Porter, The Naval History of the Civil War., Chapter 52: operations about Charleston, 1865.--fall of Charleston, Savannah, etc. (search)
y would be cut off and captured. The powerful defences on Sullivan's Island, the shapeless but still formidable ruins of Sumter, the numerous great earth-works clustered around Fort Johnson, Castle Pinckney and the heavy water batteries that lined t dated April, 1863, exhibits two lines of obstructions, designated as rope obstructions, the general direction being from Sumter to a point midway between Fort Moultrie and Battery Bee. The delineation shows a number of dotted lines, resembling the ing portion of his telegram to me August 4: My scout has just reported that the line of floating buoys reaching from Sumter to Moultrie has disappeared since yesterday. These buoys are supposed to have torpedoes attached to them, etc. This the first. It was impossible to build fortifications of masonry in time to meet the crisis which followed the attack on Sumter, and in the sand of the Southern coast nature had supplied an excellent material for rapidly building, at smaller expense