Browsing named entities in Rebellion Record: a Diary of American Events: Documents and Narratives, Volume 8. (ed. Frank Moore). You can also browse the collection for Blain (Tennessee, United States) or search for Blain (Tennessee, United States) in all documents.

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a few shells. After dark we commenced falling back; passed through Rutledge. December sixteenth, fell back to Blain's Cross-Roads, near the Ruined house. December seventeenth, remained in line of battle; some skirmishing in the front. Decve miles to Holston, near McKinney's Ferry, near the mouth of Richland Creek. December nineteenth, came back to Blain's Cross-Roads. Remained here till the twenty-first. Our brigade is about one third dismounted. At two o'clock on the evening e dismounted part moved to the bridge at Strawberry Plains. December twenty-fifth, the brigade all came back to Blain's Cross-Roads. December twenty-sixth, remained in camp. December twenty-seventh, late in the evening, our brigade moved upd a good many of the men dismounted, and as our horses were barefooted, our march was slow. At night we camped at Blain's Cross-Roads. January tenth, marched to within three miles of Clinch River. The weather very cold and the roads covered wit
n, with General Wilcox's whole command, crossed the Holston River, and camped at Bean Station. The Second cavalry brigade, Colonel Graham, was sent down to Blain's Cross-Roads, to attempt to open communication with Knoxville. He found a heavy force of the enemy's cavalry between that point and Knoxville, and, after some skirmishia cavalry in advance. Having proceeded fifteen miles, he came up with a rebel patrolling party, and soon afterward learned that a considerable force was at Blain's Cross-Roads. He moved back to Maynardsville, and on the morning of December first his pickets were attacked at the Gap, four miles below Maynardsville, on the Knoxvillnd two of the Fourteenth Illinois howitzers. More or less firing continued during the day, both parties holding their ground. A scouting-party sent toward Blain's Cross-Roads was driven back. Finding that a considerable cavalry force was approaching, with a view of surrounding him, Colonel Graham, at midnight, fell back to Walke