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Rebellion Record: a Diary of American Events: Documents and Narratives, Volume 10. (ed. Frank Moore) 12 0 Browse Search
Frederick H. Dyer, Compendium of the War of the Rebellion: Battles 10 0 Browse Search
Comte de Paris, History of the Civil War in America. Vol. 4. (ed. Henry Coppee , LL.D.) 8 0 Browse Search
The Daily Dispatch: November 11, 1861., [Electronic resource] 6 0 Browse Search
Rebellion Record: a Diary of American Events, Diary from December 17, 1860 - April 30, 1864 (ed. Frank Moore) 5 3 Browse Search
The Daily Dispatch: May 6, 1863., [Electronic resource] 4 0 Browse Search
George P. Rowell and Company's American Newspaper Directory, containing accurate lists of all the newspapers and periodicals published in the United States and territories, and the dominion of Canada, and British Colonies of North America., together with a description of the towns and cities in which they are published. (ed. George P. Rowell and company) 4 0 Browse Search
Comte de Paris, History of the Civil War in America. Vol. 1. (ed. Henry Coppee , LL.D.) 4 0 Browse Search
Rebellion Record: a Diary of American Events: Documents and Narratives, Volume 8. (ed. Frank Moore) 4 0 Browse Search
Colonel Charles E. Hooker, Confederate Military History, a library of Confederate States Military History: Volume 12.2, Mississippi (ed. Clement Anselm Evans) 4 0 Browse Search
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Browsing named entities in Rebellion Record: a Diary of American Events: Documents and Narratives, Volume 8. (ed. Frank Moore). You can also browse the collection for Brownsville, Tenn. (Tennessee, United States) or search for Brownsville, Tenn. (Tennessee, United States) in all documents.

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how the one who professed to have been an eye-witness of his death could have been mistaken. There may be some uncertainty in regard to his fate. When your committee arrived at Memphis, Tennessee, they found and examined a man (Mr. McLagan) who had been conscripted by some of Forrest's forces, but who, with other conscripts, had succeeded in making his escape. He testifies that while two companies of rebel troops, with Major Bradford and many other prisoners, were on their march from Brownsville to Jackson, Tennessee, Major Bradford was taken by five rebels--one an officer — led about fifty yards from the line of march, and deliberately murdered in view of all there assembled. He fell — killed instantly by three musket-balls, even while asking that his life might be spared, as he had fought them manfully, and was deserving of a better fate. The motive for the murder of Major Bradford seems to have been the simple fact that, although a native of the South, he remained loyal to h
ed, but hopes are entertained of his ultimate recovery. He is a brave and gallant officer, a courteous gentleman, and a consistent Christian minister. I cannot compliment too highly the conduct of Colonels Bell and McCullock and the officers and men of their brigades, which composed the forces of Brigadier-General Chahners. They fought with courage and intrepidity, and, without bayonets, assaulted and carried one of the strongest fortifications in the country. On the fifteenth, at Brownsville, I received orders which rendered it necessary to send General Chalmers, in command of his own division and Bell's brigade, southward. Hence, I have no official report from him, but will, as soon as it can be obtained, forward a complete list of our killed and wounded, which has been ordered to be made out and forwarded at the earliest possible moment. In closing my report I desire to acknowledge the prompt and energetic action of Brigadier-General Chalmers, commanding the forces arou