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Frederick H. Dyer, Compendium of the War of the Rebellion: Regimental Histories 86 4 Browse Search
Benson J. Lossing, Pictorial Field Book of the Civil War. Volume 3. 24 0 Browse Search
Frederick H. Dyer, Compendium of the War of the Rebellion: Battles 14 0 Browse Search
General James Longstreet, From Manassas to Appomattox 14 0 Browse Search
Rebellion Record: a Diary of American Events: Documents and Narratives, Volume 8. (ed. Frank Moore) 11 1 Browse Search
Comte de Paris, History of the Civil War in America. Vol. 4. (ed. Henry Coppee , LL.D.) 10 0 Browse Search
Brigadier-General Ellison Capers, Confederate Military History, a library of Confederate States Military History: Volume 5, South Carolina (ed. Clement Anselm Evans) 8 0 Browse Search
John M. Schofield, Forty-six years in the Army 8 0 Browse Search
Southern Historical Society Papers, Volume 16. (ed. Reverend J. William Jones) 8 2 Browse Search
Harper's Encyclopedia of United States History (ed. Benson Lossing) 7 1 Browse Search
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Browsing named entities in Rebellion Record: a Diary of American Events: Documents and Narratives, Volume 8. (ed. Frank Moore). You can also browse the collection for Bull's Gap (Tennessee, United States) or search for Bull's Gap (Tennessee, United States) in all documents.

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Doc. 8.-fight at Rogersville, Tenn. A national account. Bull's Gap, Tenn., Nov. 11, 1863. More than a month since, the division of reenforcements, under General O. B. Willcox, entered East-Tennessee, and, with Shackleford's division, moved immediately on the rebels at Blue Spring. After a sharp engagement, the enemy was forced to retire, with severe loss, and our forces moved up the East-Tennessee and Virginia Railroad, Willcox's division stopping at Greenville, the former home ot, and toward evening sent in a courier with the intelligence that our forces at Rogersville, consisting of the Second Tennessee and Seventh Ohio cavalry, and Second Illinois battery, had been defeated, and that the enemy was reported moving on Bull's Gap, eighteen miles in our rear. Then there was mustering in hot haste, and both divisions were quickly on the road for the Gap. Lick Creek was to be crossed before reaching the Gap, and it was feared the rebels would attempt to destroy the bridge
e Virginia forces was one part of his plans; but in this he will probably be disappointed, as the advance of General Meade will, doubtless, render the assistance of General Hill's, or any other Virginia. troops impossible. General Willcox, at Bull's Gap, reports no such or similar force in his front. Ten, or even twenty thousand rebels cannot take Knoxville, nor is that number sufficient to lay effectual blockade and siege. Many think that Longstreet, having blundered into East-Tennessee aftin the dark as to the rebel positions, numbers, or intentions. We are besieged, but by no means blockaded yet. Our forage trains scour on the south of the river. The telegraph is still in operation, and communications are open with Willcox at Bull's Gap. Some dread an assault to-morrow. I do not. The rebels have secured no positions for batteries, and evidently are not in force sufficient to invest the town. Our loss in killed, wounded, and missing would not exceed one hundred. Our dead we
ers, excelled praise. Captain Bates, of the One Hundred and Twenty-fifth Ohio, commanding skirmishers on the right of that regiment, made a charge, and, gallantly supported by the Ninety-third and the First on his right, drove the rebs nearly a quarter of a mile back, clear to their main body. Infantry skirmishers on the left also fought most stubbornly; but the cavalry being driven back, they were flanked and forced back to the grand reserve. In the open ground, looking tip the road to Bull's Gap, was a semi-circular depression, a sort of natural rifle-pit, in which the One Hundred and Twenty-fifth, grand reserve, had been posted. This proved to be the key to the whole position. The men fired by volley, and were only exposed as they rose up to deliver their fire. The ground not only sheltered them, but concealed their strength from the enemy, who tried by artillery, infantry, and sharp-shooters posted in tree-tops to dislodge them. And, though flanked on the right and left, the
s command to another officer, and returned toward Chattanooga, ostensibly to take an infantry command. He narrowly escaped capture at Cleveland, where three railroad trains fell into our hands. The rebel cavalry returned into Knoxville, arriving on Saturday previous to the famous Sunday assault at Fort Sanders. On the seventeenth of November, Colonel Foster reports that communication was cut off between the army at Knoxville and that portion under General Wilcox, stationed at and near Bull's Gap. On the eighteenth, his division, with General Wilcox's whole command, crossed the Holston River, and camped at Bean Station. The Second cavalry brigade, Colonel Graham, was sent down to Blain's Cross-Roads, to attempt to open communication with Knoxville. He found a heavy force of the enemy's cavalry between that point and Knoxville, and, after some skirmishing, followed General Wilcox's column to Tazewell. From Bean Station, the First cavalry brigade, Colonel Garrard, was despatche