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Rebellion Record: a Diary of American Events: Documents and Narratives, Volume 8. (ed. Frank Moore) 28 0 Browse Search
Rebellion Record: a Diary of American Events, Diary from December 17, 1860 - April 30, 1864 (ed. Frank Moore) 5 1 Browse Search
George P. Rowell and Company's American Newspaper Directory, containing accurate lists of all the newspapers and periodicals published in the United States and territories, and the dominion of Canada, and British Colonies of North America., together with a description of the towns and cities in which they are published. (ed. George P. Rowell and company) 4 0 Browse Search
Rebellion Record: a Diary of American Events: Documents and Narratives, Volume 10. (ed. Frank Moore) 2 0 Browse Search
Southern Historical Society Papers, Volume 9. (ed. Reverend J. William Jones) 2 0 Browse Search
Robert Underwood Johnson, Clarence Clough Buell, Battles and Leaders of the Civil War. Volume 3. 2 0 Browse Search
Frederick H. Dyer, Compendium of the War of the Rebellion: Battles 2 0 Browse Search
Frederick H. Dyer, Compendium of the War of the Rebellion: Regimental Histories 1 1 Browse Search
Capt. Calvin D. Cowles , 23d U. S. Infantry, Major George B. Davis , U. S. Army, Leslie J. Perry, Joseph W. Kirkley, The Official Military Atlas of the Civil War 1 1 Browse Search
George P. Rowell and Company's American Newspaper Directory containing accurate lists of all the newspapers and periodicals published in the United States and territories, and the dominion of Canada, and British Colonies of North America, together with a description of the towns and cities in which they are published: description of towns and cities. (ed. George P. Rowell and company) 1 1 Browse Search
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Browsing named entities in Rebellion Record: a Diary of American Events: Documents and Narratives, Volume 8. (ed. Frank Moore). You can also browse the collection for Covington, Tenn. (Tennessee, United States) or search for Covington, Tenn. (Tennessee, United States) in all documents.

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ent to our Rocky Gap battle-field of August, where we made a halt, and took a survey of the ground; and after visiting the graves of the brave and good men who repose here, we resumed the march, and halted for the night at Calighan's. Next morning, as the column started, a party of bushwhackers fired into the Second. One of the rascals was captured. We took the road to Warm Springs, and a detachment of the Eighth, under Major Slack, was sent to make a reconnoissance in the direction of Covington. During the march this morning, we were startled by an explosion, as if a steam-boiler or mine had burst, and a large volume of smoke arose. One of the caissons of Ewing's battery, in crossing a gully, had exploded, providentially injuring but three men, but scattering the contents all around, and blowing the caisson all to atoms. The accident was occasioned by a percussion-shell being carelessly packed. We arrived at the Jackson River road at one o'clock, and made a halt for the detac
struck the Fincastle pike, and distant from Covington ten miles. We had now eluded two rebel armier depot, while we turned to the left, toward Covington. Here we captured a messenger from Jones tors captured. The brigade moved rapidly to Covington, where the advance captured several of the hrn base of the Shenandoah Mountains, through Covington to Salem, burnt things generally, and return day and night to Lexington, and then toward Covington. They had yet time enough to intercept him.. While Lee and Imboden were on the road to Covington, in striking distance of that place, word waees were marching toward Buchanan instead of Covington. No man ought to have put credence in a stak, and at night were neither at Buchanan nor Covington. The story is told in a few words. The Yankees passed through Covington, and, to their great amazement, escaped. The rumor about Buchanan They who know, say Imboden begged to go to Covington. He made it plain to the dullest mind that
Rebellion Record: a Diary of American Events: Documents and Narratives, Volume 8. (ed. Frank Moore), Capture of the steamers Covington and Signal. (search)
down, as they had fired to upon us with infantry while we were repairing. At half-past 4 o'clock in the morning we all got under way; the Warner in the lead, Covington next, and the Signal last. At Dunn's Bayou (on the right going down) we were fired upon by two pieces of artillery and infantry. The Covington was hit by this Signal, wounded; A. J. Shiver, seaman, Signal, wounded; John Highland, seaman, Signal, wounded; Gabriel Frear, landsman, Signal, wounded; Isaac Highland, seaman, Covington, wounded; Lewis Jones, quartermaster, Signal, wounded. They were paroled on the sixteenth of June, and delivered to Colonel Dwight, United States army, on thee on the New National, and took to the hospital all except Lewis Jones, quartermaster of the Signal, whose time has expired, and Isaac Highland, ordinary seaman, Covington, entirely recovered. They are on board that vessel now awaiting orders. I have submitted, through the fleet surgeon, a detailed report of the casualties on b