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Frederick H. Dyer, Compendium of the War of the Rebellion: Regimental Histories 273 7 Browse Search
Official Records of the Union and Confederate Armies, Chapter XXII: Operations in Kentucky, Tennessee, North Mississippi, North Alabama, and Southwest Virginia. March 4-June 10, 1862., Part II: Correspondence, Orders, and Returns. (ed. Lieut. Col. Robert N. Scott) 109 5 Browse Search
Robert Underwood Johnson, Clarence Clough Buell, Battles and Leaders of the Civil War. Volume 3. 74 0 Browse Search
Official Records of the Union and Confederate Armies, Chapter XXII: Operations in Kentucky, Tennessee, North Mississippi, North Alabama, and Southwest Virginia. March 4-June 10, 1862. (ed. Lieut. Col. Robert N. Scott) 74 2 Browse Search
Col. J. Stoddard Johnston, Confederate Military History, a library of Confederate States Military History: Volume 9.1, Kentucky (ed. Clement Anselm Evans) 68 0 Browse Search
Edward Alfred Pollard, The lost cause; a new Southern history of the War of the Confederates ... Drawn from official sources and approved by the most distinguished Confederate leaders. 38 0 Browse Search
Comte de Paris, History of the Civil War in America. Vol. 4. (ed. Henry Coppee , LL.D.) 36 0 Browse Search
Col. O. M. Roberts, Confederate Military History, a library of Confederate States Military History: Volume 12.1, Alabama (ed. Clement Anselm Evans) 34 0 Browse Search
Frederick H. Dyer, Compendium of the War of the Rebellion: Battles 34 0 Browse Search
General James Longstreet, From Manassas to Appomattox 32 0 Browse Search
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Browsing named entities in Rebellion Record: a Diary of American Events: Documents and Narratives, Volume 8. (ed. Frank Moore). You can also browse the collection for Cumberland Gap (Tennessee, United States) or search for Cumberland Gap (Tennessee, United States) in all documents.

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Loudon Bridge, which was burned by the retreating enemy. Another small column had marched from Kentucky directly on Cumberland Gap. By a rapid flank march from Knoxville upon that place General Burnside cut off the retreat of the garrison, and forunt Vernon, as stated in my last report, the rebel army retreated across the Cumberland Mountains, leaving a force in Cumberland Gap; then moved down the Tennessee Valley to Chattanooga, and thence by Stevenson and Tullahoma to Murfreesboro, a distanlowing telegram: Headquarters of the army, Washington, D. C., September 11. General Burnside telegraphs from Cumberland Gap that he holds all East-Tennessee above Loudon, and also the gaps of the North-Carolina mountains. A cavalry force isAlabama, or into the valley of Virginia and North-Carolina. H. W. Halleck, General-in-Chief. Major-General Burnside, Cumberland Gap. On the twelfth, General Rosecrans telegraphed that, although he was sufficiently strong for the enemy then in hi
accepted tender of battle. On more than one occasion the enemy has since made demonstrations of a purpose to advance, invariably followed by a precipitate retreat to intrenched lines on the approach of our forces. The effective check thus opposed to the advance of invaders at all points was such as to afford hope of their early expulsion from portions of the territory previously occupied them, when the country was painfully surprised by the intelligence that the officer in command of Cumberland Gap had surrendered that important and easily defensible pass without firing a shot, upon the summons of a force still believed to have been inadequate to its reduction, and when reenforcements were within supporting distance and had been ordered to his aid. The entire garrison, including the commander, being still held as prisoners by the enemy, I am unable to suggest any explanation of this disaster, which laid open Eastern Tennessee and South-Western Virginia to hostile operations, and br
he twenty-second. During which time our regiment sent two large details to Cumberland Gap, and did as much foraging, scouting, and picket-duty as other regiments herrning of the fourteenth. On the morning of the fourteenth we started on to Cumberland Gap. Passed through Tazewell at nine o'clock A. M. This is the worst destroyed flourishing town. Crossed Powell River about ten o'clock P. M. Arrived at Cumberland Gap about three o'clock P. M. Remained here till the evening of the seventeenthnty-fourth. On the evening of the twenty-fourth, our brigade moved back to Cumberland Gap. Twenty-fifth, moved back the Jonesville road to Wyman's Mill. Twenty-sixth, moved back near Cumberland Gap. Twenty-seventh, moved back near Ball's Bridge. Remained here until the morning of the twenty-ninth, during which time our regiment ntil February eighth. On the evening of February eighth we crossed through Cumberland Gap into Kentucky. February ninth, crossed Cumberland River at Cumberland Fo