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Frederick H. Dyer, Compendium of the War of the Rebellion: Regimental Histories 273 7 Browse Search
Official Records of the Union and Confederate Armies, Chapter XXII: Operations in Kentucky, Tennessee, North Mississippi, North Alabama, and Southwest Virginia. March 4-June 10, 1862., Part II: Correspondence, Orders, and Returns. (ed. Lieut. Col. Robert N. Scott) 109 5 Browse Search
Robert Underwood Johnson, Clarence Clough Buell, Battles and Leaders of the Civil War. Volume 3. 74 0 Browse Search
Official Records of the Union and Confederate Armies, Chapter XXII: Operations in Kentucky, Tennessee, North Mississippi, North Alabama, and Southwest Virginia. March 4-June 10, 1862. (ed. Lieut. Col. Robert N. Scott) 74 2 Browse Search
Col. J. Stoddard Johnston, Confederate Military History, a library of Confederate States Military History: Volume 9.1, Kentucky (ed. Clement Anselm Evans) 68 0 Browse Search
Edward Alfred Pollard, The lost cause; a new Southern history of the War of the Confederates ... Drawn from official sources and approved by the most distinguished Confederate leaders. 38 0 Browse Search
Comte de Paris, History of the Civil War in America. Vol. 4. (ed. Henry Coppee , LL.D.) 36 0 Browse Search
Col. O. M. Roberts, Confederate Military History, a library of Confederate States Military History: Volume 12.1, Alabama (ed. Clement Anselm Evans) 34 0 Browse Search
Frederick H. Dyer, Compendium of the War of the Rebellion: Battles 34 0 Browse Search
General James Longstreet, From Manassas to Appomattox 32 0 Browse Search
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Browsing named entities in Maj. Jed. Hotchkiss, Confederate Military History, a library of Confederate States Military History: Volume 3, Virginia (ed. Clement Anselm Evans). You can also browse the collection for Cumberland Gap (Tennessee, United States) or search for Cumberland Gap (Tennessee, United States) in all documents.

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te of California. In extent of surface Virginia was one of the greatest of the States east of the Mississippi river, her area then being about 68,000 square miles, while New York had 47,000, all of New England 68,348, and Georgia but 59,000. Her greatest breadth from the North Carolina line to the northern end of the panhandle, within 900 miles of Lake Erie, was about 430 miles; her greatest length, from east to west along the North Carolina and Tennessee lines, from the Atlantic to Cumberland gap, was 440 miles. Her outline was varied and richly developed. On the east the Virginian sea of the Atlantic and Chesapeake bay—with its many tidal rivers and estuaries, some penetrating her territory fully 150 miles, dividing it into numerous large and small peninsulas and furnishing more than 1,500 miles of tide-washed shore line, with numerous harbors of unsurpassed capacity and depth—permeate over 11,000 square miles of her tidewater country. The navigable Ohio belonged to her all al
urther object of this expedition was to drive away the Confederate cavalry that was wintering in east Tennessee and Virginia, not far from the Virginia line, and at the same time to damage, as much as possible, the Virginia & East Tennessee railroad, extending from Lynchburg to Bristol, from which large supplies of food and forage were sent to the army of Northern Virginia. Leaving Knoxville, December 10, 1864, General Gillem's command united. with Stoneman's, which had advanced from Cumberland gap, near Bean's Station, east Tennessee, on the 12th, and had a skirmish with the outposts of Gen. Basil Duke near Rogersville; then an action with his advance at Kingsport, Tenn., on the 13th, defeating Duke and driving his command toward Bristol, near which place, at Papertown, on the 14th, Stoneman attacked Vaughn's Tennessee brigade, of the Confederate army, which was guarding the railroad and the main turnpike road leading into the southwestern part of the Great valley of Virginia, and
nia infantry. When Beauregard was transferred to the west, he recommended the promotion of Stevenson, among others, to brigade and division command of the western troops, and Stevenson was accordingly made brigadier-general in February, 1862. On March 15th, he was ordered to report to General Huger for assignment on the Weldon railroad, but soon after was transferred to the department of East Tennessee, and given command of a division of troops. After the Federal General Morgan seized Cumberland Gap, he was in command of the Confederate force which threatened that position and compelled Morgan's withdrawal. After July 17th he pursued the Federal forces into Kentucky, and there made a junction with Kirby Smith, with whom he served during the return to Murfreesboro. In October he was promoted major-general. In December, 1862, he was sent by Bragg from Murfreesboro with 10,000 men to reinforce Pemberton at Vicksburg, already threatened by the Federal army. He reached the field of