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Frederick H. Dyer, Compendium of the War of the Rebellion: Regimental Histories 273 7 Browse Search
Official Records of the Union and Confederate Armies, Chapter XXII: Operations in Kentucky, Tennessee, North Mississippi, North Alabama, and Southwest Virginia. March 4-June 10, 1862., Part II: Correspondence, Orders, and Returns. (ed. Lieut. Col. Robert N. Scott) 109 5 Browse Search
Robert Underwood Johnson, Clarence Clough Buell, Battles and Leaders of the Civil War. Volume 3. 74 0 Browse Search
Official Records of the Union and Confederate Armies, Chapter XXII: Operations in Kentucky, Tennessee, North Mississippi, North Alabama, and Southwest Virginia. March 4-June 10, 1862. (ed. Lieut. Col. Robert N. Scott) 74 2 Browse Search
Col. J. Stoddard Johnston, Confederate Military History, a library of Confederate States Military History: Volume 9.1, Kentucky (ed. Clement Anselm Evans) 68 0 Browse Search
Edward Alfred Pollard, The lost cause; a new Southern history of the War of the Confederates ... Drawn from official sources and approved by the most distinguished Confederate leaders. 38 0 Browse Search
Comte de Paris, History of the Civil War in America. Vol. 4. (ed. Henry Coppee , LL.D.) 36 0 Browse Search
Col. O. M. Roberts, Confederate Military History, a library of Confederate States Military History: Volume 12.1, Alabama (ed. Clement Anselm Evans) 34 0 Browse Search
Frederick H. Dyer, Compendium of the War of the Rebellion: Battles 34 0 Browse Search
General James Longstreet, From Manassas to Appomattox 32 0 Browse Search
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Browsing named entities in The Daily Dispatch: February 5, 1862., [Electronic resource]. You can also browse the collection for Cumberland Gap (Tennessee, United States) or search for Cumberland Gap (Tennessee, United States) in all documents.

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ong as the war lasts. I would as soon risk him as any of them. " A similar feeling, I find, prevails with the volunteers encamped here. They think Floyd would be the man to retrieve the Fishing creek disaster, repulse the advance of the Federalists into East Tennessee, and lead our forces to victory. The young Mississippian, after an unsuccessful effort to desert, succeeded on a second trial. He made his way through South western Virginia into Tennessee, was arrested and taken to Cumberland Gap, then brought to this place. He soon enlisted as a recruit for a company in the harbor of Charleston, S. C. The day before he was to start he was attacked with typhoid fever, from which he is just recovered. When fully able, he will join his company. With reference to the recent defeat in Kentucky, everybody deplores it, but the public mind has quieted and resumed a tone of confidence. All accounts, both Southern and Northern, agree our men fought well. Those who left the ranks