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Frederick H. Dyer, Compendium of the War of the Rebellion: Regimental Histories 137 1 Browse Search
Rebellion Record: a Diary of American Events: Documents and Narratives, Volume 11. (ed. Frank Moore) 82 0 Browse Search
Official Records of the Union and Confederate Armies, Chapter XXII: Operations in Kentucky, Tennessee, North Mississippi, North Alabama, and Southwest Virginia. March 4-June 10, 1862., Part II: Correspondence, Orders, and Returns. (ed. Lieut. Col. Robert N. Scott) 56 0 Browse Search
Adam Badeau, Military history of Ulysses S. Grant from April 1861 to April 1865. Volume 3 46 0 Browse Search
Adam Badeau, Military history of Ulysses S. Grant from April 1861 to April 1865. Volume 2 46 0 Browse Search
Colonel William Preston Johnston, The Life of General Albert Sidney Johnston : His Service in the Armies of the United States, the Republic of Texas, and the Confederate States. 30 0 Browse Search
Alfred Roman, The military operations of General Beauregard in the war between the states, 1861 to 1865 30 0 Browse Search
William Boynton, Sherman's Historical Raid 28 0 Browse Search
Col. O. M. Roberts, Confederate Military History, a library of Confederate States Military History: Volume 12.1, Alabama (ed. Clement Anselm Evans) 28 0 Browse Search
Adam Badeau, Military history of Ulysses S. Grant from April 1861 to April 1865. Volume 1 28 0 Browse Search
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Browsing named entities in Robert Underwood Johnson, Clarence Clough Buell, Battles and Leaders of the Civil War. Volume 4.. You can also browse the collection for Decatur (Tennessee, United States) or search for Decatur (Tennessee, United States) in all documents.

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Robert Underwood Johnson, Clarence Clough Buell, Battles and Leaders of the Civil War. Volume 4., The opposing forces in the Atlanta campaign. May 3d-September 8th, 1864. (search)
ter; 27th Ohio, Lieut.-Col. Mendal Churchill; 39th Ohio, Col. Edward F. Noyes, Lieut.-Col. H. T. McDowell, Maj. John S. Jenkins, Lieut.-Col. H. T. McDowell, Maj. John S. Jenkins. Second Brigade, Brig.-Gen. John W. Sprague: 35th N. J., Capt. Charles A. Angel, Col. John J. Cladek, Lieut.-Col. William A. Henry; 43d Ohio, Col. Wager Swayne; 63d Ohio, Lieut.-Col. Charles E. Brown, Maj. John W. Fonts; 25th Wis., Col. Milton Montgomery, Lieut.-Col. Jeremiah M. Rusk. Third Brigade (joined army from Decatur Aug. 7th), Col. William T. C. Grower, Col. John Tillson: 10th Ill. (assigned Aug. 20th), Capt. George C. Lusk; 25th Ind., Lieut.-Col. John Rhein-Lander, Capt. James S. Wright; 17th N. Y. (transferred to Second Division, Fourteenth Corps, Aug. 20th), Maj. Joel O. Martin; 32d Wis., Lieut.-Col. Charles H. De Groat. Artillery, Capt. Jerome B. Burrows, Capt. George Robinson: C, 1st Mich., Capt. George Robinson, Lieut. Henry Shier; 14th Ohio, Capt. J. B. Burrows, Lieut. Seth M. Laird, Lieut. Geor
Robert Underwood Johnson, Clarence Clough Buell, Battles and Leaders of the Civil War. Volume 4., Cavalry operations in the West under Rosecrans and Sherman. (search)
ticle by General Duke, p. 243.] In October, 1864, General Hood, having led his army from Georgia into northern Alabama, was organizing for his expedition into Tennessee. At the same time Forrest was operating with his usual energy and activity. On the 30th of October he suddenly appeared with a strong force on the Tennessee River, near Johnsonville, where he captured a gun-boat, the Undine, and two transports — an exploit which excited very general admiration. He then joined Hood near Decatur. At this time General John T. Croxton, with a brigade of Union cavalry, was watching along the north bank of the Tennessee, and on the 7th of November was joined by General Edward Hatch with a division. This body, numbering about three thousand men, kept a sharp lookout for indications of Hood's advance. On the 20th it became apparent that Hood was moving in the direction of Lawrenceburg Hatch skirmished with Forrest, and while the infantry under Schofield fell back from Pulaski to Colum
Robert Underwood Johnson, Clarence Clough Buell, Battles and Leaders of the Civil War. Volume 4., chapter 9.64 (search)
0 prisoners, two pieces of artillery, 20 wagons and teams by Forrest's cavalry at La Vergne; of the capture and destruction of three block houses on the Chattanooga Railroad by Bate's division; and of the seizure the day previous by Chalmers of two transports on the Cumberland River with 300 mules on board. We had in our possession two engines and several cars, which ran as far south as Pulaski. Dispatches were sent to Generals Beauregard and Maury to repair the railroad from Corinth to Decatur, as our trains would be running in a day or two to the latter point. This means of transportation was of great service in furnishing supplies to the army. When we reached middle Tennessee our troops had an abundance of provisions, although sorely in need of shoes and clothing. General Bate's division was ordered to return to the army; Forrest was instructed to direct Palmer's and Mercer's infantry brigades to thoroughly intrench on Stewart's Creek, or at LaVergne, according as he might
Robert Underwood Johnson, Clarence Clough Buell, Battles and Leaders of the Civil War. Volume 4., Repelling Hood's invasion of Tennessee. (search)
quarters at Gaylesville,--a position, as he wrote to General Halleck, very good to watch the enemy. In spite of this watch, Hood suddenly appeared on the 26th at Decatur, on the Tennessee River, seventy-five miles north-west of Gadsden. This move was a complete surprise, and evidently meant business. The Fourth Corps, numberinge, to report to General Thomas. On the 1st of November its leading division reached Pulaski, Tennessee, a small town on the railroad, about forty miles north of Decatur, where it was joined four days later by the other two. Making a slight though somewhat lengthened demonstration against Decatur, General Hood pushed on to TuscDecatur, General Hood pushed on to Tuscumbia, forty-five miles west. Here he expected to find — what he had weeks before ordered — ample supplies, and the railroad in operation to Corinth. But he was doomed to disappointment. Instead of being in condition to make the rapid and triumphant march with which he had inflamed the ardor of his troops, he was detained three
Robert Underwood Johnson, Clarence Clough Buell, Battles and Leaders of the Civil War. Volume 4., The Union cavalry in the Hood campaign. (search)
00 horses fit for service. The failure of the light-draught gun-boats on the Tennessee River to reach and destroy the pontoon-bridge which Hood had kept in position insured his safe retreat. The cavalry advanced guard, under the active and enterprising Spalding, reached the north bank of the river just as the bridge had been swung to the south side and the last of the rebels were disappearing in the distance. Another part of the cavalry corps under General W. J. Palmer sallied out from Decatur with General Steedman and finally overtook the remnant of Hood's army, destroyed his pontoon-train, with all of his remaining wagons, and captured several hundred prisoners. The report of the provost-marshal shows that, during the operations beginning at Nashville on the 15th, and ending at the Tennessee River 175 miles south, on the 28th of December, the cavalry corps captured 32 field-guns, 11 caissons, 12 colors, 3332 prisoners, including one general officer, one train of 80 pontoons,
Robert Underwood Johnson, Clarence Clough Buell, Battles and Leaders of the Civil War. Volume 4., The opposing forces at Nashville, Dec. 15-16, 1864. (search)
December 10th, 70,272. In his official report, General Thomas says that his effective force early in November consisted of the Fourth Corps, about 12,000, under General D. S. Stanley; the Twenty-third Corps, about 10,000, under General J. M. Schofield; Hatch's division of cavalry, about 4000; Croxton's brigade, 2500, and Capron's brigade of about 1200 [total, 29,700]. The balance of my force was distributed along the railroad, and posted at Murfreesboro‘, Stevenson, Bridgeport, Huntsville, Decatur, and Chattanooga, to keep open our communications and hold the posts above named, if attacked, until they could be reeinforced, as up to this time it was impossible to determine which course Hood would take — advance on Nashville, or turn toward Huntsville. It is estimated that the available Union force of all arms in and about Nashville on December 15th aggregated at least 55,000. Col. Henry Stone, of General Thomas's staff, furnishes the following estimate of the number of Union troops a