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Document Max. Freq Min. Freq
Frederick H. Dyer, Compendium of the War of the Rebellion: Regimental Histories 137 1 Browse Search
Rebellion Record: a Diary of American Events: Documents and Narratives, Volume 11. (ed. Frank Moore) 82 0 Browse Search
Official Records of the Union and Confederate Armies, Chapter XXII: Operations in Kentucky, Tennessee, North Mississippi, North Alabama, and Southwest Virginia. March 4-June 10, 1862., Part II: Correspondence, Orders, and Returns. (ed. Lieut. Col. Robert N. Scott) 56 0 Browse Search
Adam Badeau, Military history of Ulysses S. Grant from April 1861 to April 1865. Volume 2 46 0 Browse Search
Adam Badeau, Military history of Ulysses S. Grant from April 1861 to April 1865. Volume 3 46 0 Browse Search
Alfred Roman, The military operations of General Beauregard in the war between the states, 1861 to 1865 30 0 Browse Search
Colonel William Preston Johnston, The Life of General Albert Sidney Johnston : His Service in the Armies of the United States, the Republic of Texas, and the Confederate States. 30 0 Browse Search
William Boynton, Sherman's Historical Raid 28 0 Browse Search
Col. O. M. Roberts, Confederate Military History, a library of Confederate States Military History: Volume 12.1, Alabama (ed. Clement Anselm Evans) 28 0 Browse Search
Adam Badeau, Military history of Ulysses S. Grant from April 1861 to April 1865. Volume 1 28 0 Browse Search
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Browsing named entities in Rebellion Record: a Diary of American Events: Documents and Narratives, Volume 4. (ed. Frank Moore). You can also browse the collection for Decatur (Tennessee, United States) or search for Decatur (Tennessee, United States) in all documents.

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reaching the tollgate, on the top of the hill overlooking Nashville, I strained my eyes to see the white flag on the capitol. The tall flag-staff was naked. There was no flag of any sort on it. Passing down Broad street by the Nashville and Decatur road, the first man I saw was Gov. Harris, about to leave on a special train, with the Legislature and archives of the State. The town was in commotion. Over the wire bridge that spans the Cumberland, Gen. Johnston's army were passing, taking d to stand with him. Such of them as were not willing to be surrendered to the uncovenanted mercies of Lincolndom, with the prospect of having the oath tendered them or the bastile, followed the retiring army. After taking my family as far as Decatur, I returned to Nashville on Wednesday. The stores were closed and bolted; the streets deserted, save by a guard here and there, and a press-gang taking up every man they could find, and sending him to load government pork into barges, upon whic
Tenn., under date of April second, says: Feeling greatly alarmed lest an insurrection of the whites should occur in portions of the country around McMinnville, certain conservators of Southern rights despatched messengers, not long since, to Decatur, praying for confederate aid. In answer to their entreaties, Capts. McHenry and Bledsoe were sent up with two companies of Tennessee cavalry, to dragoon the threatening populace into submission. About the time they reached McMinnville, last Wedpaths of their flight. Mr. Ewing's shot-gun was found in a creek, hard by the scene of his great achievement, the barrel separated from the stock by the furious manner in which he threw it away. When he arrived in McMinnville his valor was all gone. Making but a brief stay, to recruit his broken wind, he disappeared, and has not been heard of since. The confederate cavalry who shared his glory on the field, were last seen in Franklin County, on their way back to Decatur by forced marches.
Tenn., under date of April second, says: Feeling greatly alarmed lest an insurrection of the whites should occur in portions of the country around McMinnville, certain conservators of Southern rights despatched messengers, not long since, to Decatur, praying for confederate aid. In answer to their entreaties, Capts. McHenry and Bledsoe were sent up with two companies of Tennessee cavalry, to dragoon the threatening populace into submission. About the time they reached McMinnville, last Weds paths of their flight. Mr. Ewing's shot-gun was found in a creek, hard by the scene of his great achievement, the barrel separated from the stock by the furious manner in which he threw it away. When he arrived in McMinnville his valor was all gone. Making but a brief stay, to recruit his broken wind, he disappeared, and has not been heard of since. The confederate cavalry who shared his glory on the field, were last seen in Franklin County, on their way back to Decatur by forced marches.