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George Ticknor, Life, letters and journals of George Ticknor (ed. George Hillard) 48 0 Browse Search
George Ticknor, Life, letters and journals of George Ticknor (ed. George Hillard) 24 0 Browse Search
Official Records of the Union and Confederate Armies, Chapter XXII: Operations in Kentucky, Tennessee, North Mississippi, North Alabama, and Southwest Virginia. March 4-June 10, 1862. (ed. Lieut. Col. Robert N. Scott) 19 1 Browse Search
Harper's Encyclopedia of United States History (ed. Benson Lossing) 16 0 Browse Search
Official Records of the Union and Confederate Armies, Chapter XXII: Operations in Kentucky, Tennessee, North Mississippi, North Alabama, and Southwest Virginia. March 4-June 10, 1862., Part II: Correspondence, Orders, and Returns. (ed. Lieut. Col. Robert N. Scott) 10 0 Browse Search
Frederick H. Dyer, Compendium of the War of the Rebellion: Regimental Histories 6 0 Browse Search
George Bancroft, History of the United States from the Discovery of the American Continent, Vol. 4, 15th edition. 6 0 Browse Search
Rebellion Record: a Diary of American Events: Documents and Narratives, Volume 6. (ed. Frank Moore) 6 0 Browse Search
Southern Historical Society Papers, Volume 11. (ed. Reverend J. William Jones) 6 0 Browse Search
Cambridge History of American Literature: volume 3 (ed. Trent, William Peterfield, 1862-1939., Erskine, John, 1879-1951., Sherman, Stuart Pratt, 1881-1926., Van Doren, Carl, 1885-1950.) 4 0 Browse Search
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Browsing named entities in George Ticknor, Life, letters and journals of George Ticknor (ed. George Hillard). You can also browse the collection for Dresden, Tenn. (Tennessee, United States) or search for Dresden, Tenn. (Tennessee, United States) in all documents.

Your search returned 12 results in 7 document sections:

George Ticknor, Life, letters and journals of George Ticknor (ed. George Hillard), Chapter 1: (search)
still more lively with coffee-houses, puppet-shows, and shows of animals. . . . . But we enjoyed very much the drive into the more picturesque parts, where the deer were browsing undisturbed, and oaks a thousand years old cast their shade upon us, as they had, perchance, in their youth upon the Court of Charlemagne. In some places they were making hay, in others there were preserves of wild birds; and, though it is nowhere more beautiful and nowhere so well kept as the Grosse Garten, near Dresden, it is, by its extent, much grander and finer. . . . . June 23.—In the evening we drove out to Mr. Von Hammer's, at Dobling, Baron von Hammer-Purgstall. where he has a country-house about four or five English miles from Vienna. I had a letter to him, and he came to see me the other day; a very lively, prompt, frank gentleman, of sixty-two years, talking English very well, French and Italian, but famous, as everybody knows, for his knowledge of Oriental languages, and for his great wo
George Ticknor, Life, letters and journals of George Ticknor (ed. George Hillard), Chapter 4: (search)
, and the printed books from seventy thousand to one hundred and fifty thousand. Indeed, it is difficult to tell, for all its treasures are shut up in low cases, which are kept locked, and give you no means of estimating their contents, but to unlock them all and count them. We were shown at first through all the halls, and the cases that contain curious works in ivory, ebony, amber, and so on, were opened to us. It was not much, almost nothing, compared with the magnificent collection at Dresden, or even the moderate one at Vienna. Then we saw the manuscripts, which are, of course, precious indeed, since the library is the oldest in Europe, and their collection began as early as 465, and was put into the shape most desirable by Nicholas V. and Leo X., as well as greatly enriched by the last: the Virgil of the fourth or fifth century, with its rude but curious miniatures; the Terence, less old, probably, but very remarkable; the autograph manuscripts of Petrarca and Tasso; the be
George Ticknor, Life, letters and journals of George Ticknor (ed. George Hillard), Chapter 10: (search)
ee how popular she is in the New World. My family are all well, and we have had great health and happiness and little sorrow since we saw you. We all remember Dresden, and its hospitalities, with much pleasure and gratitude, and hope we have friends there who will not entirely forget us. Mrs. Ticknor desires that her acknowledgand compliments may be offered to you. I remain, my dear Prince, Very faithfully and affectionately yours, George Ticknor. From Prince John, of Saxony. Dresden, 4 July, 1842. dear Sir, Prince John always wrote to Mr. Ticknor in English, and the correspondence continued till the end of Mr. Ticknor's life.—I have rec this, he was of a most warm and affectionate spirit. I had known him familiarly from 1819, when we studied together in Edinburgh. When we passed that winter in Dresden, in 1835-36, of which you know so well, he, being then our minister at Brussels, came to us and spent a week with us; and every year but one, since we came home,
George Ticknor, Life, letters and journals of George Ticknor (ed. George Hillard), Chapter 11: (search)
ce of men who know better, and are stronger than they are. In a society where public opinion governs, unsound opinions must be rebuked, and you can no more do that, while you treat their apostles with favor, than you can discourage bad books at the moment you are buying and circulating them. . . . . To Prince John, of Saxony. Boston, U. S. A., July 30, 1848. My dear Prince,—Your kind and interesting letter of the 14th of May, with one from Count Circourt, written after he had been at Dresden, have kept you almost constantly in our thoughts of late. Indeed, it is difficult to think of anything else but the changes that are now going on, like a solemn drama, in Europe; not only because the fate and fortunes of so many of our personal friends are put at hazard by them, but because they involve so deeply the cause of Christian civilization and the paramount interests of our common humanity. We feel, to be sure, comparatively safe ourselves. Our people are young; we have room
George Ticknor, Life, letters and journals of George Ticknor (ed. George Hillard), Chapter 13: (search)
oment's chance for preparation, Mr. Ticknor responded with what a person present asserts was one of the happiest and most effective little speeches he had ever heard. This was the only time Mr. Ticknor was ever entrapped into such a performance; a fact as significant of his tastes, as the testimony to his success is significant of his gifts. . . . . Hoping that when your leisure permits we may hear from you again, Very sincerely yours, Geo. Ticknor To Prince John, Duke of Saxony, Dresden. Boston, July 22, 1850. my dear Prince,—I have desired to write to you for some time, and acknowledge the receipt of a very interesting and instructive letter which you sent me in the spring, and a note of May 9, in which you speak with your accustomed kindness of my History of Spanish Literature, of which I had early ventured to send you a copy. But the state of our public affairs, on which I wished to say something, seemed every week to be likely to take a decisive turn . . . . I hav
George Ticknor, Life, letters and journals of George Ticknor (ed. George Hillard), Chapter 24: (search)
, U. S. A., September 29, 1870. Sire,—Your Majesty is called to great private suffering, as well as to great public anxieties. We have just received a notice of the death of your excellent sister, the Princess Amelia, and we well know what sorrow this brings upon you and your house. She was so good, so intellectual, so agreeable. Be assured that we sympathize, in my home, with this your great affliction. We can never forget the constant kindness of the Princess to us when we lived in Dresden, and when we met her in Florence. All of my family who recollect her, as well as younger members who never had the happiness to see her, and very many persons in my country, are familiar with her charming dramas, and estimate, as they should, the bright light that has been extinguished. We have indeed known little of the Princess Amelia's life for the last two or three years, but none the less do we know how her loss will be felt by those who were constantly near her, and shared her dail
George Ticknor, Life, letters and journals of George Ticknor (ed. George Hillard), chapter 30 (search)
478. Doyle, Miss, I 447. Doyle, Sir, Francis, I. 442, 446, 447, II. 149 Draveil Chateau, visits, I. 146-148. Dresden, visits, I. 109, 456-489, II. 329, 330, 333, 334; picture-gallery, I. 109, 468. Drew, Mrs., I. 180. Droz, M., II. 13 Hartford Convention, Mr. Jefferson, 12-16, 26-41. 1815-16. To England, Holland, and Gottingen, 49-106; Weimar, Berlin, Dresden, 106-116; Gottingen, 116-121. 1817-18. Accepts professorship at Harvard College, 120; visits France, Italy, Spain, and hip, 399; second visit to Europe, 402-511, II. 1-183. 1835-36. England, Ireland, Belgium, Germany, I. 402-456; winter in Dresden, 456-492; Berlin, Bohemia, 493-511. 1836-37. Austria, Bavaria, Switzerland, Italy, II. 1-58, winter in Rome, 58-86. 18374. 1852-67. Connection with Boston Public Library, 299-320. 1856-57. Third visit to Europe, 321-400; London, Brussels, Dresden, Berlin, Vienna, Milan, Florence, 311-315, 321-311; winter in Home, 315, 316, 341-349; Naples, Florence, Turin, Paris, L