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Frederick H. Dyer, Compendium of the War of the Rebellion: Battles 16 0 Browse Search
Rebellion Record: a Diary of American Events: Documents and Narratives, Volume 7. (ed. Frank Moore) 10 0 Browse Search
Colonel William Preston Johnston, The Life of General Albert Sidney Johnston : His Service in the Armies of the United States, the Republic of Texas, and the Confederate States. 9 1 Browse Search
George P. Rowell and Company's American Newspaper Directory, containing accurate lists of all the newspapers and periodicals published in the United States and territories, and the dominion of Canada, and British Colonies of North America., together with a description of the towns and cities in which they are published. (ed. George P. Rowell and company) 8 0 Browse Search
Rebellion Record: a Diary of American Events: Documents and Narratives, Volume 5. (ed. Frank Moore) 8 0 Browse Search
Official Records of the Union and Confederate Armies, Chapter XXII: Operations in Kentucky, Tennessee, North Mississippi, North Alabama, and Southwest Virginia. March 4-June 10, 1862. (ed. Lieut. Col. Robert N. Scott) 7 1 Browse Search
John Beatty, The Citizen-Soldier; or, Memoirs of a Volunteer 6 0 Browse Search
Official Records of the Union and Confederate Armies, Chapter XXII: Operations in Kentucky, Tennessee, North Mississippi, North Alabama, and Southwest Virginia. March 4-June 10, 1862., Part II: Correspondence, Orders, and Returns. (ed. Lieut. Col. Robert N. Scott) 6 0 Browse Search
William F. Fox, Lt. Col. U. S. V., Regimental Losses in the American Civil War, 1861-1865: A Treatise on the extent and nature of the mortuary losses in the Union regiments, with full and exhaustive statistics compiled from the official records on file in the state military bureaus and at Washington 6 2 Browse Search
Alfred Roman, The military operations of General Beauregard in the war between the states, 1861 to 1865 6 0 Browse Search
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Browsing named entities in Rebellion Record: a Diary of American Events: Documents and Narratives, Volume 5. (ed. Frank Moore). You can also browse the collection for Fayetteville, Tenn. (Tennessee, United States) or search for Fayetteville, Tenn. (Tennessee, United States) in all documents.

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s to occupy that place with the Eighth Kentucky infantry, where it still remains. The Ninth Michigan moved on to Shelbyville, where it arrived at four P. M. Learning from scouts that the enemy was at Unionville, and moving northward, I telegraphed Col. Lester, of the Third Minnesota infantry, to place a strong guard at the bridges near Murfreesboro, and Colonel Barnes, of the Eighth Kentucky infantry, to adopt a similar precaution near Wartrace; and after bivouacking for the night on the Fayetteville road, near Shelbyville, proceeded to Murfreesboro at daybreak on the fourth instant, by railway, with the Ninth Michigan infantry, halting at the cross-roads, and throwing out scouting parties in both directions. On reaching Murfreesboro, in the afternoon, I learned that the enemy, at noon, had crossed the railway ten miles north of this place, tearing up the track, and burning a quantity of cotton stored there, and that upon the arrival of the First Kentucky cavalry, Col. Wolford, from
euts. Wharton, Funk, Sypher, and Nell, deserve special notice. Yours, very truly, James S. Negley, Brig.-Gen. Commanding. Cincinnati Commercial account. Under an order from Gen. Mitchel, Gen. Negley, in charge of a heavy force, left Fayetteville on Monday, June second, to pay a friendly visit to the large bodies of guerrillas infesting the counties of Franklin and Marion, in East-Tennes-see, with additional instructions to call on Chattanooga, if possible, and Mitchel seldom deems anyo the cause that has called him out from his Pennsylvania home. His worth is known and highly appreciated by our Commanding General. He is a Pennsylvanian, and reflects great honor on the old Keystone State. He found no rebel forces between Fayetteville and Winchester. On reaching Winchester, he learned that the rebel General Adams was in command of a heavy force of rebels at Jasper, some thirty miles distant. He at once determined to surprise them. In order to do this, he was compelled t
ooga and capturing or dispersing any of the rebel forces of cavalry hovering around that portion of the country. It was authoritatively reported that the rebels had made a preconcerted movement for the purpose of recapturing Nashville; but that object was frustrated by the energy and intrepidity of General Negley and his troops, as will be seen by the following statement: General N. started from Columbia, on the day above named, with a sufficient force of troops. General N. reached Fayetteville on Saturday, May thirty-first, remained there until Monday morning following, and then resumed his march and proceeded to Salem, where he arrived the same day. The next day he reached Winchester. It had been reported that the rebels were in considerable force in that place, and the Seventh Pennsylvania cavalry made a dash into the town, but found the enemy had dispersed. They succeeded, however, in capturing Capt. Trimble and three of his men, belonging to Starn's cavalry. This Trim