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Official Records of the Union and Confederate Armies, Chapter XXII: Operations in Kentucky, Tennessee, North Mississippi, North Alabama, and Southwest Virginia. March 4-June 10, 1862. (ed. Lieut. Col. Robert N. Scott) 56 4 Browse Search
Alfred Roman, The military operations of General Beauregard in the war between the states, 1861 to 1865 54 0 Browse Search
Official Records of the Union and Confederate Armies, Chapter XXII: Operations in Kentucky, Tennessee, North Mississippi, North Alabama, and Southwest Virginia. March 4-June 10, 1862., Part II: Correspondence, Orders, and Returns. (ed. Lieut. Col. Robert N. Scott) 42 0 Browse Search
Colonel William Preston Johnston, The Life of General Albert Sidney Johnston : His Service in the Armies of the United States, the Republic of Texas, and the Confederate States. 32 0 Browse Search
Robert Underwood Johnson, Clarence Clough Buell, Battles and Leaders of the Civil War: The Opening Battles. Volume 1. 28 0 Browse Search
Benson J. Lossing, Pictorial Field Book of the Civil War. Volume 2. 16 0 Browse Search
Knight's Mechanical Encyclopedia (ed. Knight) 16 0 Browse Search
Frederick H. Dyer, Compendium of the War of the Rebellion: Regimental Histories 14 2 Browse Search
Thomas Wentworth Higginson, Henry Wadsworth Longfellow 12 0 Browse Search
William Tecumseh Sherman, Memoirs of General William T. Sherman . 10 0 Browse Search
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Browsing named entities in Admiral David D. Porter, The Naval History of the Civil War.. You can also browse the collection for Hamburg, Tenn. (Tennessee, United States) or search for Hamburg, Tenn. (Tennessee, United States) in all documents.

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Admiral David D. Porter, The Naval History of the Civil War., Chapter 30: (search)
ent. The expedition destroyed an immense amount of property of various kinds, valued at two millions of dollars, among which were three large cotton mills and magazines of corn; they also captured sixty-five prisoners. Meanwhile one hundred and fifty cavalry had landed at Savannah, under cover of the guns of the Covington, intending to operate in that neighborhood and keep open communication between Colonel Conger and the gun-boats. The Forest Rose and Robb covered the landing opposite Hamburg. The force at Savannah had captured some stock and brought it in; but on one occasion, while returning from an expedition, the commanding officer of the party, being pressed by a superior force of the enemy, abandoned his captured stock and barely succeeded in reaching Savannah, where Lieutenant-Commander Phelps found his troops covered by the Covington. Colonel Bissel, the Confederate commander, had invested the town, and given one hour for the removal of the women and children before