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Colonel William Preston Johnston, The Life of General Albert Sidney Johnston : His Service in the Armies of the United States, the Republic of Texas, and the Confederate States. 24 0 Browse Search
Robert Underwood Johnson, Clarence Clough Buell, Battles and Leaders of the Civil War: The Opening Battles. Volume 1. 2 0 Browse Search
Ulysses S. Grant, Personal Memoirs of U. S. Grant 2 0 Browse Search
Robert Underwood Johnson, Clarence Clough Buell, Battles and Leaders of the Civil War: Volume 2. 2 0 Browse Search
Frederick H. Dyer, Compendium of the War of the Rebellion: Regimental Histories 1 1 Browse Search
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Browsing named entities in Colonel William Preston Johnston, The Life of General Albert Sidney Johnston : His Service in the Armies of the United States, the Republic of Texas, and the Confederate States.. You can also browse the collection for Henry, Tenn. (Tennessee, United States) or search for Henry, Tenn. (Tennessee, United States) in all documents.

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re than the gunboats, and the gunboats more than Grant's army. General Tilghman says in his report in one place that his force was 2,734 effective troops at Fort Henry, in another that it was 2,610; and General Gilmer puts it at about 3,200. A careful examination of the returns satisfies the writer that the latter statement is nearly correct, and that Tilghman had about 3,400 men present at Fort Henry, and 2,300 or 2,400 more at Fort Donelson. On January 31st he had 3,033 effectives at Henry, and 1,956 at Donelson. The Fiftieth Tennessee, numbering 386, was transferred from Henry to Donelson, leaving 2,647 at the former and 2,342 at the latter. Subsequently, there arrived at Fort Henry reinforcements from General Polk, the Forty-eighth and Fifty-first Tennessee, and the Fifteenth Arkansas, which added some 700 or 800 effectives to his numbers, and gave him at the two forts about 5,750 men. In his report of the bombardment of Fort Henry General Tilghman says: Had I be
dable. Indeed, the success of the gunboats at Henry had produced an exaggerated impression of thein were much demoralized by the transactions at Henry, and this was true. They were the rawest milisistance could be offered to the approach from Henry, and that Donelson must be yielded without resat Donelson, dispute vigorously the roads from Henry, fortify as strongly and speedily as possible, estimated it at 17,000, thus: Garrisons of Henry and Donelson5,000 Floyd's and Buckner's comma00. Let us now turn to the Federal army at Henry. Grant, elated by success, telegraphed Hallec the army that marched across the country from Henry. On the same day Grant sent forward his vateries; and he left a garrison of 2,500 men at Henry. He marched unincumbered with tents or baggag i., p. 36. The column which marched from Henry was composed of two divisions, commanded by Gemmanders, composed of troops sent forward from Henry, and others transported by way of the Cumberla[1 more...]