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Official Records of the Union and Confederate Armies, Chapter XXII: Operations in Kentucky, Tennessee, North Mississippi, North Alabama, and Southwest Virginia. March 4-June 10, 1862., Part II: Correspondence, Orders, and Returns. (ed. Lieut. Col. Robert N. Scott) 83 11 Browse Search
Comte de Paris, History of the Civil War in America. Vol. 4. (ed. Henry Coppee , LL.D.) 48 0 Browse Search
Rebellion Record: a Diary of American Events: Documents and Narratives, Volume 8. (ed. Frank Moore) 28 0 Browse Search
Rebellion Record: a Diary of American Events: Documents and Narratives, Volume 7. (ed. Frank Moore) 24 0 Browse Search
General James Longstreet, From Manassas to Appomattox 18 0 Browse Search
Adam Badeau, Military history of Ulysses S. Grant from April 1861 to April 1865. Volume 1 14 0 Browse Search
Frederick H. Dyer, Compendium of the War of the Rebellion: Regimental Histories 14 2 Browse Search
Frederick H. Dyer, Compendium of the War of the Rebellion: Battles 14 0 Browse Search
Robert Underwood Johnson, Clarence Clough Buell, Battles and Leaders of the Civil War. Volume 3. 12 0 Browse Search
Horace Greeley, The American Conflict: A History of the Great Rebellion in the United States of America, 1860-65: its Causes, Incidents, and Results: Intended to exhibit especially its moral and political phases with the drift and progress of American opinion respecting human slavery from 1776 to the close of the War for the Union. Volume II. 10 2 Browse Search
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Browsing named entities in Rebellion Record: a Diary of American Events: Documents and Narratives, Volume 8. (ed. Frank Moore). You can also browse the collection for Kingston (Tennessee, United States) or search for Kingston (Tennessee, United States) in all documents.

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through which they passed, but were finally completely destroyed, nearly every man being killed or taken prisoner. The detachment of the Ninth army corps, to reenforce General Grant before Vicksburgh, delayed somewhat General Burnside's preparations for an active campaign in East-Tennessee. The necessity, however, of cooperating with the movements of General Rosecrans compelled him to take the field without awaiting the return of this corps. His main column moved on three roads, making Kingston his objective point, which place was reached on the first of September. Knoxville was also occupied on the first by Colonel Foster, and General Shackleford moved forward to Loudon Bridge, which was burned by the retreating enemy. Another small column had marched from Kentucky directly on Cumberland Gap. By a rapid flank march from Knoxville upon that place General Burnside cut off the retreat of the garrison, and forced it to surrender September ninth. He captured fourteen pieces of art
Tenn. Knoxville, Tenn., November 7, 1863. The first engagement of any consequence between our forces and those of Longstreet, in the retreat to Knoxville, took place yesterday, at Campbell's Station — a little collection of houses on the Kingston road, where it forms a junction with the road to Loudon. During the night of Sunday, the rebels made three different charges on our position at Lenoir, with the intention of capturing the batteries on the right of our position; but every onser the march. The result was, that a series of heavy skirmishes ensued along the whole line of the retreat. As we approached Campbell's Station, where it was feared the enemy would endeavor to throw a force upon our flank, from the direction of Kingston, the division of Colonel Hartrauft was marched through the timber until it came upon the road leading from that point. In a short space of time, the wisdom of the precaution manifested itself; for the rebels soon made their appearance, but too
tack than I can direct. With your showing, you had better give up Kingston at the last moment, and save the most productive part of your possthat time. I can hardly conceive of the enemy breaking through at Kingston, and pushing for Kentucky. If they should, however, a new problemgest the route. I will not attempt to lay out a line of retreat. Kingston, looking at the map, I thought of more importance than any one poiments enough firm other commands, including the force available at Kingston, to make twenty thousand men, in readiness to go to the relief of tructions, which were full and complete, and that he must push for Kingston, near which we would make a junction. By the time I reached Athenhe geography, and sent him orders which found him at Decatur; that Kingston was out of our way; that he should send his boat to Kingston, but Kingston, but with his command strike across to Philadelphia, and report to me there. I had but a small force of cavalry, which was, at the time of my rece
they could enfilade our left lines. Cameron sent the Twenty-fourth Kentucky to feel of them, and a sharp contest ensued for the possession of the hill. The Twenty-fourth Kentucky were unable to hold the ground. The One Hundred and Third Ohio and Sixty-fifth Illinois, sent to reenforce them, finally drove the enemy from the coveted position. Our loss in this affair was sixty killed and wounded. Matters are now assuming an interesting outlook. Old scout Reynolds came in this evening from Kingston, bringing confirmation of Bragg's defeat and the assurance of present aid from Grant. Sherman is said to be at Cleveland, Generals Fry and Willcox at Bean's Station, and considerable force at Wytheville — from all of which, if true, Longstreet's position will not prove to be an easy one. His chief care will now be to effect his escape by the North-Carolina mountains as the only road left open to him. Orders by General Burnside. headquarters army of the Ohio, Knoxville, Tenn., Nov
ille, a place fourteen miles to his left, to connect with a force under General Stanley, sent out by General Thomas. Colonel Oliver reached the place without difficulty, but could learn nothing of Stanley's command, and returned. That night it was ascertained from different sources of information — deserters, prisoners, and refugees — that the enemy was preparing to attack him with a superior force. Two regiments of mounted infantry with two field-batteries, which were already moving from Kingston, a large cavalry force under Wheeler and Roddy, estimated at four thousand five hundred, together with the force which had fallen back before his advance, were to concentrate the next day at Town Creek, at an admirable place for offensive operations, and which he was obliged to pass on his return. Smith had nothing but infantry and cavalry; no artillery and no wagons in which to bring off his wounded in case of an engagement. He was then forty-two miles from the Tennessee, and from any re
of the enemy's attention, and oblige him to keep a large force of his cavalry busy beyond the immediate lines of the siege. The first important movement of the enemy, after they laid siege to Knoxville, was to send a large body of cavalry to Kingston, to operate in that quarter. This was on the twenty-fourth of November. On the twenty-sixth, as near as I am able to ascertain, the cavalry under General Wheeler found Colonel Byrd's brigade strongly intrenched near Kingston, and after a fruitKingston, and after a fruitless effort to dislodge or capture him, and losing a considerable number of men, he withdrew. Wheeler hereupon turned over his command to another officer, and returned toward Chattanooga, ostensibly to take an infantry command. He narrowly escaped capture at Cleveland, where three railroad trains fell into our hands. The rebel cavalry returned into Knoxville, arriving on Saturday previous to the famous Sunday assault at Fort Sanders. On the seventeenth of November, Colonel Foster reports t