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Frederick H. Dyer, Compendium of the War of the Rebellion: Regimental Histories 145 1 Browse Search
Rebellion Record: a Diary of American Events: Documents and Narratives, Volume 6. (ed. Frank Moore) 45 1 Browse Search
Col. O. M. Roberts, Confederate Military History, a library of Confederate States Military History: Volume 12.1, Alabama (ed. Clement Anselm Evans) 31 7 Browse Search
Frederick H. Dyer, Compendium of the War of the Rebellion: Battles 26 0 Browse Search
Rebellion Record: a Diary of American Events: Documents and Narratives, Volume 10. (ed. Frank Moore) 22 0 Browse Search
John Beatty, The Citizen-Soldier; or, Memoirs of a Volunteer 20 0 Browse Search
Horace Greeley, The American Conflict: A History of the Great Rebellion in the United States of America, 1860-65: its Causes, Incidents, and Results: Intended to exhibit especially its moral and political phases with the drift and progress of American opinion respecting human slavery from 1776 to the close of the War for the Union. Volume II. 18 2 Browse Search
Comte de Paris, History of the Civil War in America. Vol. 2. (ed. Henry Coppee , LL.D.) 16 0 Browse Search
Benson J. Lossing, Pictorial Field Book of the Civil War. Volume 2. 14 0 Browse Search
Robert Underwood Johnson, Clarence Clough Buell, Battles and Leaders of the Civil War. Volume 3. 10 0 Browse Search
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Browsing named entities in Philip Henry Sheridan, Personal Memoirs of P. H. Sheridan, General, United States Army .. You can also browse the collection for Lavergne (Tennessee, United States) or search for Lavergne (Tennessee, United States) in all documents.

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tional confidence in our invincibility made us all keen for a test of strength with the Confederates. We had not long to wait. Early on the morning of December 26, 1862, in a heavy rain, the army marched, the movement being directed on Murfreesboroa, where the enemy had made some preparation to go into winter-quarters, and to hold which town it was hoped he would accept battle. General Thomas moved by the Franklin and Wilson pikes, General Crittenden by the Murfreesboroa pike, through Lavergne, and General McCook by the Nolensville pike-Davis's division in advance. As McCook's command neared Nolensville, I received a message from Davis informing me that the Confederates were in considerable force, posted on a range of hills in his front, and requesting me to support him in an attack he was about to make. When the head of my column arrived at Nolensville I began massing my troops on the right of the road, and by the time this formation was nearly completed Davis advanced, but no