Browsing named entities in Rebellion Record: a Diary of American Events: Documents and Narratives, Volume 8. (ed. Frank Moore). You can also browse the collection for Lewisburg (Tennessee, United States) or search for Lewisburg (Tennessee, United States) in all documents.

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ng he was reenforced by General Echols, from Lewisburgh, with Patten's brigade and a regiment of Jen General Duffle, from the Kanawha valley, at Lewisburgh, on the seventh, two days hence. We, therefawha forces would intercept the fugitives at Lewisburgh. Saturday morning was warm and spring-like, and we took up the line of march for Lewisburgh. After our descent from the mountains, we enteretown of Frankfort, and a short distance from Lewisburgh we came to the camp of the Twenty-second, scontas County--a point about forty miles from Lewisburgh, where was stationed the First brigade, commnd reached a point about fourteen miles from Lewisburgh, on the fifth instant. There it was learnedp of Droop Mountain, twenty-eight miles from Lewisburgh. Early on the morning of the sixth the mas, several thousand strong, were marching on Lewisburgh, by the Kanawha road, to cut him off. It was-important to get our teams and artillery by Lewisburgh and across the Green Brier River, before the[1 more...]
neral Averill attacked a rebel force under General Sam Jones, at Rocky Gap, in Green Brier County, capturing one gun, one hundred and fifty prisoners, and killing and wounding some two hundred. Our loss in killed, wounded, and missing, was one hundred and thirty. On the eleventh of September, Imboden attacked a small force of our troops at Morefield, wounding fifteen and capturing about one hundred and fifty. On the fifth of November, General Averill attacked and defeated the enemy near Lewisburgh, capturing three pieces, over one hundred prisoners, and a large number of small arms, wagons, and camp equipage. The enemy's loss in killed and wounded estimated at three hundred. Department of Virginia and North-Carolina. Our force in North-Carolina, during the past year, has been too small for any important operations against the enemy, and, consequently, has acted mostly on the defensive, holding the important positions previously captured from the rebels. Nevertheless, General
es under Averill, gives us the following interesting narrative of that gallant affair: On the thirteenth instant, scouts belonging to General Jackson's brigade reported that a Yankee force of about five thousand cavalry, including two batteries of artillery, were advancing down Black Creek, toward Gatewood's, within twelve miles of Warm Springs, in Bath County. Information had at that time been received from General Samuel Jones, that a heavy force of Yankees were also advancing upon Lewisburgh from the Kanawha valley. General Jackson at once concluded that the force of five thousand under Averill would strike for the Tennessee Railroad, by way of the Sweet Springs, and he immediately put his force in motion to intercept them on their return, as he could not pursue them, owing to having only about one hundred and twenty-five mounted men, the balance of his command being dismounted infantry. Crossing at McGraw's Gap, General Jackson came to Jackson's River, and found it swollen a