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Comte de Paris, History of the Civil War in America. Vol. 4. (ed. Henry Coppee , LL.D.) 166 0 Browse Search
Frederick H. Dyer, Compendium of the War of the Rebellion: Regimental Histories 142 0 Browse Search
Robert Underwood Johnson, Clarence Clough Buell, Battles and Leaders of the Civil War. Volume 3. 104 0 Browse Search
Rebellion Record: a Diary of American Events: Documents and Narratives, Volume 8. (ed. Frank Moore) 94 0 Browse Search
Benson J. Lossing, Pictorial Field Book of the Civil War. Volume 3. 94 0 Browse Search
Rebellion Record: a Diary of American Events: Documents and Narratives, Volume 7. (ed. Frank Moore) 72 0 Browse Search
Southern Historical Society Papers, Volume 11. (ed. Reverend J. William Jones) 64 0 Browse Search
Adam Badeau, Military history of Ulysses S. Grant from April 1861 to April 1865. Volume 1 64 0 Browse Search
Horace Greeley, The American Conflict: A History of the Great Rebellion in the United States of America, 1860-65: its Causes, Incidents, and Results: Intended to exhibit especially its moral and political phases with the drift and progress of American opinion respecting human slavery from 1776 to the close of the War for the Union. Volume II. 53 1 Browse Search
The Photographic History of The Civil War: in ten volumes, Thousands of Scenes Photographed 1861-65, with Text by many Special Authorities, Volume 2: Two Years of Grim War. (ed. Francis Trevelyan Miller) 52 0 Browse Search
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Browsing named entities in Southern Historical Society Papers, Volume 11. (ed. Reverend J. William Jones). You can also browse the collection for Lookout Mountain, Tenn. (Tennessee, United States) or search for Lookout Mountain, Tenn. (Tennessee, United States) in all documents.

Your search returned 32 results in 7 document sections:

Southern Historical Society Papers, Volume 11. (ed. Reverend J. William Jones), General Beauregard's report of the battle of Drury's Bluff. (search)
the direction of Dalton and Rome, keeping Lookout mountain between us. The nature of the country, anhattanooga and fronting the east slope of Lookout mountain. The forces on the Hiawassee and at Chicad of McLemore's cove, a valley formed by Lookout mountain and a spur of the main ridge called Pigeor thousand to eight thousand, had crossed Lookout mountain into the cove by way of Stevens's and Coo or 5,000 strong, encamped at the foot of Lookout mountain, at Stevens's gap. Another column of the g of General Bragg's army, at the foot of Lookout Mountain, and drove it back rapidly, the line at tmap showing the roads and streams between Lookout mountain and the Chickamauga river, and a general afayette, and just at the eastern base of Lookout Mountain. General Hill had mistaken the purport ofachment on the road between the enemy and Lookout Mountain, in rear of the force we were to attack ally and truly yours, will. T. Martin. Lookout Mountain and Missionary Ridge. Report of Genera[4 more...]
Southern Historical Society Papers, Volume 11. (ed. Reverend J. William Jones), The battle of Chickamauga. (search)
eneral movement was towards our left and rear, in the direction of Dalton and Rome, keeping Lookout mountain between us. The nature of the country, and the want of supplies in it, with the presence ofill to Lafayette, on the road leading south from Chattanooga and fronting the east slope of Lookout mountain. The forces on the Hiawassee and at Chickamauga Station, took the route by Ringgold. A sm now in Wills's valley, one nearly opposite the head of McLemore's cove, a valley formed by Lookout mountain and a spur of the main ridge called Pigeon mountain, and the other at or near Colonel Winsts ascertained that a column, estimated at from four thousand to eight thousand, had crossed Lookout mountain into the cove by way of Stevens's and Cooper's gaps. Thrown off his guard by our rapid movyou will move upon the enemy, reported to be 4,000 or 5,000 strong, encamped at the foot of Lookout mountain, at Stevens's gap. Another column of the enemy is reported to be at Cooper's gap—number not
Southern Historical Society Papers, Volume 11. (ed. Reverend J. William Jones), Sketch of Third battery of Maryland Artillery. (search)
e battery from the Fortieth, Forty-first, Forty-third, Fifty-second and Fifty-sixth Georgia regiments to act as drivers. The battery encamped at the foot of Lookout Mountain on the 13th, and on the 23d joined Johnston's battalion, which was then encamped across Lookout Creek, near Missionary Ridge. On the morning of the 23d of November, the enemy, under cover of a heavy fog, moved up and attacked the left wing of General Bragg's army, at the foot of Lookout Mountain, and drove it back rapidly, the line at that point being weak and the attack unexpected. The evacuation of Lookout Mountain followed and Bragg withdrew to Missionary Ridge. Early the foLookout Mountain followed and Bragg withdrew to Missionary Ridge. Early the following morning Johnston's battalion was ordered to the extreme right of the Confederate line, and reached the position assigned it at 2 o'clock in the afternoon. Two of the batteries, Corput's and Carnes's, were ordered to the front at once, while the Third Maryland was held in reserve. In the struggle which ensued, the enemy w
Southern Historical Society Papers, Volume 11. (ed. Reverend J. William Jones), Battle of Chickamauga. (search)
noon of the 19th of September. As soon as our horses came up, about 4 o'clock, I started with Colonel Sorrel and Colonel Manning, of my staff, to find the headquarters of the Commanding General. We missed our way, and did not report until near 11 o'clock at night. Upon my arrival, I was informed that the troops had been engaged during the day in severe skirmishing, while endeavoring to get in line for battle. The Commanding General gave me a map showing the roads and streams between Lookout mountain and the Chickamauga river, and a general description of our position, and informed me that the battle was ordered at daylight the next morning; the action to be brought on upon our right and to be taken us successively to the left, the general movement to be a wheel upon my extreme left as a pivot. I was assigned to the command of the left wing, composed of Hood's and Hindman's divisions, an improved division under Brigadier-General B. R. Johnson, and Buckner's corps, consisting of Ste
Southern Historical Society Papers, Volume 11. (ed. Reverend J. William Jones), A defence of General Bragg's conduct at Chickamauga. (search)
over mountain roads to pass from McCook's corps to Thomas's, and to crown the opportunity for a swift stroke Thomas's two advance divisions were separated by Lookout Mountain from the rest of his corps. This was the brilliant opportunity which General Bragg lost with his eyes open, with full knowledge of the false position of Tnemy had concentrated or was concentrating McCook and Thomas's corps, on his left and rear at Alpine, southwest of Lafayette, and just at the eastern base of Lookout Mountain. General Hill had mistaken the purport of the information received, which you had correctly understood and acted upon The mistake arose from a want of maps aported to him for duty, took command of my troops, which were in observation in front and upon his flank, with a detachment on the road between the enemy and Lookout Mountain, in rear of the force we were to attack and between it and any support or reinforcement. I gave General Hindman what information I possessed about the Cov
Southern Historical Society Papers, Volume 11. (ed. Reverend J. William Jones), Lookout Mountain and Missionary Ridge. (search)
Lookout Mountain and Missionary Ridge. Report of General Braxton Bragg. headquarters Army of Tennessee, Dalton, 30th November, 1863. General S. Cooper, Adjutant and Inspector General, Richmond: Sir,—On Monday the 23rd, the enemy advanced in heavy force and drove in our picket line in front of Missionary Ridge, but made no further effort. On Tuesday morning early, they threw over the river a heavy force opposite the north end of the ridge and just below the mouth of Chickamauga,iate front. After visiting the right, and making dispositions there for the new development in that direction, I returned towards the left, to find a heavy cannonading going on from the enemy's batteries on our forces occupying the slope of Lookout Mountain, between the crest and the river. A very heavy force soon advanced to the assault and was met by one brigade only, Walthall's, which made a desperate resistance, but was finally compelled to yield ground; why this command was not sustaine
Southern Historical Society Papers, Volume 11. (ed. Reverend J. William Jones), chapter 78 (search)
on from Lee & Gordon's mills to Lafayette, on the road leading south from Chattanooga and fronting the east slope of Lookout Mountain. (General Bragg's report, page 4.) But he gave the benefit of the doubt to the former contingency, and commenced a o the results and consequences of this battle, read the concluding part of General Bragg's report. All the passes of Lookout Mountain, which had been in possession of the enemy since our abandonment of Chattanooga during the month previous, and which. Lee, at the residence of Mr. James T. Harrison, that he concurred with General Bragg in attributing the capture of Lookout Mountain by Hooker to the disobedience of orders by Longstreet. General Bragg had ordered him to occupy Sand Mountain, I thipi, under the command of Colonel Campbell, Hooker's corps, which Longstreet had permitted to obtain a lodgment on Lookout Mountain. they had reached midway the mountains, when the ever-watchful, gallant, and chivalric Walthall, who with his brigad