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Southern Historical Society Papers, Volume 10. (ed. Reverend J. William Jones), The battle of Chickamauga-letter from Captain W. N. Polk. (search)
s the official evacuation of the place to points beyond range outside, and the withdrawal of stores to points of convenience on the railroad to the rear, and the withdrawal of Anderson's brigade from Bridgeport. On the 26th, or 27th of August, or some five or six days after the surprise of Chattanooga, Burnside's advance into East Tennessee was announced by the presence of his cavalry in the vicinity of Knoxville, and Major-General Buckner received orders to evacuate Knoxville, and occupy Loudon. In consequence of a demonstration, it is said, by a portion of Rosecrans's army at Blythe's ferry, on the Tennessee river, opposite the mouth of the Hiwassee, he was ordered to fall back from London to Charleston, and soon after to the vicinity of Chattanooga. Pending these movements above, which were to give East Tennessee to the Federals, not only for occupation, but for cooperation with Rosecrans in his designs upon Chattanooga and the Army of Tennessee, Rosecrans was not idle below.
Southern Historical Society Papers, Volume 10. (ed. Reverend J. William Jones), Sketch of the Third Battery of Maryland Artillery. (search)
andeur. Bathed in brilliant sunlight, peak rose above peak, till vision was lost in the far distance. Immediately beneath, the rich and verdant valley lay displayed in surpassing beauty, exhibiting no sign of smoking camp fires, or other evidences of an enemy's presence. With some reluctance the two observers withdrew, to report to General Reynolds the result of their reconnoissance. Again on the 6th of June, the brigade proceeded to Chattanooga, Tennessee, and thence to Morristown and Loudon, in the same State. After a few days a march was made to Blain's Cross Roads, where the brigade remained till the 1st of August, 1862. The camp here was called Camp Hatton, in honor of General R. Hatton, who was killed near Richmond in June of the same year. During this encampment the battery received fifty recruits from Georgia. The next movement was to Tazewell, in East Tennessee, where the enemy was met, defeated, and driven back to Cumberland Gap. On the night of the 16th inst.,