Browsing named entities in Rebellion Record: a Diary of American Events: Documents and Narratives, Volume 8. (ed. Frank Moore). You can also browse the collection for Pulaski, Tenn. (Tennessee, United States) or search for Pulaski, Tenn. (Tennessee, United States) in all documents.

Your search returned 3 results in 3 document sections:

d marched to Rogersville and the Elk River. This was found to be impassable. To ferry would have consumed too much time, and to build a bridge still more, and there was no alternative but to turn up Elk River by way of Gilbertsboro, Elkton, etc., to the stone bridge at Fayetteville. There we crossed Elk, and proceeded to Winchester and Decherd. At Fayetteville I received orders from General Grant to come to Bridgeport with the Fifteenth army corps, and leave General Dodge's command at Pulaski and along the railroad from Columbia to Decatur. I instructed General Blair to follow with the Second and First divisions by way of New-Market, Larkinsville, and Bellefonte, while I conducted the other two divisions by Decherd, the Fourth division crossing the mountains to Stevenson, and the Third by University Place and Sweiden's Cave. In person I proceeded by Sweiden's Lane and Battle Creek, reaching Bridgeport at night of November thirteenth. I immediately telegraphed to the Comma
ember twenty-sixth, 1863, and showing no disposition as yet to assume the offensive. Desertions from the enemy still continued numerous, averaging thirty (30) per day, nearly all of whom wished to embrace the terms of the President's Amnesty Proclamation, which, with Major-General Grant's General Order No. 10, of Headquarters Military Division of Mississippi, had been freely circulated within the rebel lines for some time previous. On the twentieth of January, General G. M. Dodge, at Pulaski, Tenn., having ascertained that a force of rebel cavalry under Roddy, was constructing flat-boats, and hiding them in Little Bear Creek, Spring Creek, and Town Creek, and also that one of Roddy's regiments was foraging on the north side of the Tennessee River, he immediately informed General Grant of these movements of the enemy, who directed me to organize an expedition at once, of sufficient force to drive Roddy away from where he was reported to be, and to destroy all boats and materials tha
nger of carrying away any portion of the track. All troops are therefore being moved up to Barber's, and probably by the time you receive this, I shall be in motion in advance of that point. That a force may not be brought from Georgia (Savannah) to interfere with my movements, it is desirable that a display be made in the Savannah River; and I therefore urge that upon the reception of this, such naval force, transports, sailing vessels, etc., as can be so devoted, may rendezvous near Pulaski, and that the iron-clads in Warsaw push up with as much activity as they can exert. I look upon this as of great importance, and shall rely upon it as a demonstration in my favor. There is reason to believe that General Hardee is in Lake City, now possibly in command, and with some force at his disposal. But nothing is visible this side of Sanderson. Saddles, etc., for mounting the Seventh New-Hampshire as rapidly as possible, are greatly needed, and I shall send a portion of that