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Official Records of the Union and Confederate Armies, Chapter XXII: Operations in Kentucky, Tennessee, North Mississippi, North Alabama, and Southwest Virginia. March 4-June 10, 1862., Part II: Correspondence, Orders, and Returns. (ed. Lieut. Col. Robert N. Scott) 138 0 Browse Search
Official Records of the Union and Confederate Armies, Chapter XXII: Operations in Kentucky, Tennessee, North Mississippi, North Alabama, and Southwest Virginia. March 4-June 10, 1862. (ed. Lieut. Col. Robert N. Scott) 108 6 Browse Search
Frederick H. Dyer, Compendium of the War of the Rebellion: Regimental Histories 45 3 Browse Search
Alfred Roman, The military operations of General Beauregard in the war between the states, 1861 to 1865 44 0 Browse Search
Robert Underwood Johnson, Clarence Clough Buell, Battles and Leaders of the Civil War: The Opening Battles. Volume 1. 42 0 Browse Search
Rebellion Record: a Diary of American Events: Documents and Narratives, Volume 4. (ed. Frank Moore) 42 0 Browse Search
Colonel William Preston Johnston, The Life of General Albert Sidney Johnston : His Service in the Armies of the United States, the Republic of Texas, and the Confederate States. 40 0 Browse Search
William Tecumseh Sherman, Memoirs of General William T. Sherman . 24 0 Browse Search
Robert Underwood Johnson, Clarence Clough Buell, Battles and Leaders of the Civil War: Volume 2. 20 0 Browse Search
Adam Badeau, Military history of Ulysses S. Grant from April 1861 to April 1865. Volume 1 18 0 Browse Search
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Browsing named entities in Rebellion Record: a Diary of American Events: Documents and Narratives, Volume 5. (ed. Frank Moore). You can also browse the collection for Purdy (Tennessee, United States) or search for Purdy (Tennessee, United States) in all documents.

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in Corinth. The house is nearly two miles from me, and about one and a quarter miles from the enemy's outer intrenchments, and the position, though important, is too exposed for a single brigade, with our line disposed as at present. Gen. Hurlbut has two companies at Russell's and two regiments along the edge of a field which lies to the east of Russell's house. This house is now the advance picket-station in our front, and I have a chain of sentinels round by the right to a point on the Purdy and Corinth road, where it joins on to the pickets of Gen. McClernand. There was no loss sustained by Gens. Hurlbut or Denver's commands in their flank movements on Russell's; but the loss in Gen. Morgan L. Smith's brigade was pretty heavy--ten killed and thirty-one wounded, a list of whom will accompany this report. The confederates left twelve dead on the ground, whom we buried. They removed their wounded, of which many traces were on the ground and in the house. Among their dead was
rovement on the march — the absence of that straggling which is too common in the volunteer service; and still more, their improved character on picket and as skirmishers. Our line of march has been along a strongly marked ridge, followed by the Purdy and Corinth road, and ever since leaving the Locusts our pickets have been fighting. Hardly an hour, night or day, for two weeks, without the exchange of hostile shots. But we have steadily and surely gained ground — slowly, to be sure, but wit disdain for the Yankees, who viewed them in return rather in a spirit of pity than revenge. The rebel generals all had their headquarters in houses — generally occupying the finest residences in the place. Beauregard's was on the east of the Purdy road, and at the outskirts of the place. The rebel chieftain was evidently surrounded by all the comforts and luxuries of life. Telegraph wires run in every direction from the building, the system adopted being similar to that employed in our o<
ieth, meantime guarding the passes of Owl Creek, and making frequent cavalry reconnoissances westerly in the direction of Purdy, and southerly, on each side of the creek, in the direction of Pea Ridge. Here, as a precaution against surprise, I thned his small force against the enemy's cavalry and, boldly attacking them, drove them back in confusion upon and through Purdy, killing a number of them and losing one man and several horses. This achievement prevented the enemy from turning our fand moved forward about two miles and a half, in the direction of Corinth, to the crossing of the Old State line with the Purdy and Farmington road. Encamping here, near Fielder's house, a reconnoissance in the direction of Corinth was immediately ously made, Captain Townshend came in contact with the enemy's pickets near Easel's house, on the Hack road, leading from Purdy to Corinth, and drove back their accumulating numbers some distance. This position, at the cross-roads, was vital to t