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Rebellion Record: a Diary of American Events: Documents and Narratives, Volume 8. (ed. Frank Moore) 18 0 Browse Search
Frederick H. Dyer, Compendium of the War of the Rebellion: Battles 18 0 Browse Search
Rebellion Record: a Diary of American Events: Documents and Narratives, Volume 7. (ed. Frank Moore) 14 0 Browse Search
Comte de Paris, History of the Civil War in America. Vol. 4. (ed. Henry Coppee , LL.D.) 12 0 Browse Search
Rebellion Record: a Diary of American Events, Diary from December 17, 1860 - April 30, 1864 (ed. Frank Moore) 5 1 Browse Search
Comte de Paris, History of the Civil War in America. Vol. 3. (ed. Henry Coppee , LL.D.) 4 0 Browse Search
Rebellion Record: a Diary of American Events: Documents and Narratives, Volume 11. (ed. Frank Moore) 2 0 Browse Search
Frederick H. Dyer, Compendium of the War of the Rebellion: Regimental Histories 1 1 Browse Search
Capt. Calvin D. Cowles , 23d U. S. Infantry, Major George B. Davis , U. S. Army, Leslie J. Perry, Joseph W. Kirkley, The Official Military Atlas of the Civil War 1 1 Browse Search
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Browsing named entities in Rebellion Record: a Diary of American Events: Documents and Narratives, Volume 8. (ed. Frank Moore). You can also browse the collection for Rossville (Tennessee, United States) or search for Rossville (Tennessee, United States) in all documents.

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end more men to Chattanooga, where those already there could not be fully supplied, would only increase the embarrassment, and probably cause the evacuation of that place. In other words, Hooker's command was to temporarily perform the duties previously assigned to the reenforcements ordered from Grant's army. We will now return to General Rosecrans's army, the main body of which we left on the fourteenth in the passes of Pigeon Mountain, with the enemy concentrating his forces, near La Fayette, to dispute its further advance. Bragg's threatened movements to the right and left were merely cavalry raids to cut off Rosecrans's line of supplies, and threaten his communications with Burnside. His main army was probably only awaiting the arrival of Longstreet's corps to give battle in the mountains of Georgia. Of the movements of this corps, so well known to the enemy, we could get no reliable information. All we knew positively was, that one of Longstreet's divisions had arrive
nge. As soon as he was notified of the fact that the rebels were crossing at La Fayette, the Third brigade, cavalry division, was ordered to the cars to proceed to tring was heard in advance, and the boys pushed anxiously ahead. Upon nearing La Fayette, which was aglow with the light of burning houses, it was found that a part otion in that direction, while the main body of Forrest's army vent south from La Fayette with their conscripts, cattle, etc., and got safely across the Tallahatchie. Mizener, with a brigade of cavalry, attempted to intercept the enemy, between La Fayette and Holly Springs, but they had too much start, and the attempt failed. At tan be no doubt that if General Hurlbut's orders had been properly executed at La Fayette, Forrest and his whole force would now have been our prisoners. During theers escaped. In the great hurry in which the rebels made their crossing at La Fayette, there was necessarily much confusion and straggling. By some means an offic
evacuated Chattanooga Valley. These facts being reported, the whole force, under General Hooker, moved about ten o'clock A. M., toward Rossville, situated at the base of Missionary Ridge, five miles distant from Chattanooga, at which place the La Fayette road passes through a gorge in the ridge. Having to rebuild the destroyed bridge over Chattanooga Creek, it was after two o'clock P. M. before our advance, General Osterhaus's division, reached the rebel lines strongly posted in the gorge. Thdes of our division, followed by General Geary's division. Delayed at Chickamauga to rebuild bridge, we reached Peavine Valley about sunset, and the forces advanced cautiously through its mud and dense underbrush, until the advance reached the La Fayette road, where it found a battery and train of the enemy moving. One volley captured all, scattering the men therewith in every direction. General Palmer's forces there took the Grayville road to the left. Our division moved forward out of the