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We moved but about a mile to-day. December seventh, moved several miles past where we were encamped on the eighth of October. December eighth, moved on to Rutledge, county-seat of Grainger County. December ninth, passed through Rutledge and on to Bean's Station. Here our regiment was sent out on the Morristown road to tRutledge and on to Bean's Station. Here our regiment was sent out on the Morristown road to the Holston River. Here we ran upon the rebels; had considerable skirmishing; lost one man. After dark we returned to the station. December tenth, remained at the station. December eleventh, Colonel Pennebaker, with our brigade, went to Morristown. Made no attack on the enemy, as he was about a mile east of town. We return managed to get a battery on the mountains on our right, and about sundown began to hand down a few shells. After dark we commenced falling back; passed through Rutledge. December sixteenth, fell back to Blain's Cross-Roads, near the Ruined house. December seventeenth, remained in line of battle; some skirmishing in the fro
Doc. 118.-the retreat of Longstreet. Bean Station, Tenn., Rutledge road, December 12, 1863. Ascertaining that the enemy had raised the siege, See the Siege of Knoxville, Doc. 19, ante. and were on the retreat early on Saturday morning, December fifth, General Shackleford, commanding the cavalry corps, was ordered in pursuit. He commenced skirmishing with the enemy's rear-guard eight miles from Knoxville, on the Rutledge and Morristown road. He drove them steadily to Bean Station, forty-two miles from Knoxville, where he found the enemy's cavalry in line of battle. On Thursday mornings, Colonel Bond's brigade, of Woodford's division, was in the advance. He charged, and drove the enemy from the place. The treating army had been foraging right and left along their line of retreat. He captured about one hundred and fifty prisoners during the pursuit as far as to Bean Station. Many of the rebels, both infantry and cavalry, purposely fell out and gave themselves up. Th