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Frederick H. Dyer, Compendium of the War of the Rebellion: Regimental Histories 339 107 Browse Search
Robert Underwood Johnson, Clarence Clough Buell, Battles and Leaders of the Civil War: The Opening Battles. Volume 1. 78 0 Browse Search
Colonel William Preston Johnston, The Life of General Albert Sidney Johnston : His Service in the Armies of the United States, the Republic of Texas, and the Confederate States. 64 0 Browse Search
Official Records of the Union and Confederate Armies, Chapter XXII: Operations in Kentucky, Tennessee, North Mississippi, North Alabama, and Southwest Virginia. March 4-June 10, 1862., Part II: Correspondence, Orders, and Returns. (ed. Lieut. Col. Robert N. Scott) 47 1 Browse Search
Official Records of the Union and Confederate Armies, Chapter XXII: Operations in Kentucky, Tennessee, North Mississippi, North Alabama, and Southwest Virginia. March 4-June 10, 1862. (ed. Lieut. Col. Robert N. Scott) 44 6 Browse Search
Alfred Roman, The military operations of General Beauregard in the war between the states, 1861 to 1865 40 0 Browse Search
Benson J. Lossing, Pictorial Field Book of the Civil War. Volume 2. 34 0 Browse Search
Rebellion Record: a Diary of American Events: Documents and Narratives, Volume 4. (ed. Frank Moore) 32 4 Browse Search
Horace Greeley, The American Conflict: A History of the Great Rebellion in the United States of America, 1860-65: its Causes, Incidents, and Results: Intended to exhibit especially its moral and political phases with the drift and progress of American opinion respecting human slavery from 1776 to the close of the War for the Union. Volume II. 27 1 Browse Search
Comte de Paris, History of the Civil War in America. Vol. 1. (ed. Henry Coppee , LL.D.) 26 0 Browse Search
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Browsing named entities in Colonel William Preston Johnston, The Life of General Albert Sidney Johnston : His Service in the Armies of the United States, the Republic of Texas, and the Confederate States.. You can also browse the collection for Savannah, Tenn. (Tennessee, United States) or search for Savannah, Tenn. (Tennessee, United States) in all documents.

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ommand, relieving Smith, who was lying ill at Savannah on his death-bed. Smith died April 25th--a v four miles below Hamburg, six or seven above Savannah, the Federal depot on the right bank, and tweke Florence, Alabama, instead of Pittsburg or Savannah, the base of a combined movement. But Hallec orders of General Halleck, and he designated Savannah, on the east bank of the Tennessee, as the pllly learned, a few days before his arrival at Savannah, that General Grant was not there, but on the him to halt at Waynesboro, thirty miles from Savannah- Saying he could not leave St. Louis untro, I made no halt, but continued my march to Savannah. And further yet, the day before his arrival at Savannah, General Nelson, who commanded my leading division, advised General Grant by courier ofd him, at Columbia, that he was not wanted at Savannah before Monday, April 7th, but, everything faville to Wynn's15 Bethel to Purdy4 Bethel to Savannah23 Monterey to Purdy15 Monterey to Farmingto[4 more...]
With the Tennessee River as the Federal base, its Great Bend from Florence to Savannah formed a salient, to which the railway system conformed. Corinth was the cent General Buell in motion 30,000 strong, rapidly from Columbia by Clifton to Savannah. Mitchell behind him with 10,000. Confederate forces-40,000-ordered forward t to-night, at Mickey's house, at the intersection of the road from Monterey to Savannah. The cavalry, thrown well forward during the march to reconnoitre and preventas practicable; the right wing with left in front by the road from Monterey to Savannah, the head of column to reach the immediate vicinity of Mickey's house, at the efore sunset. The cavalry with this wing will take position on the road to Savannah beyond Mickey's as far as Owl Creek, having advanced guards and pickets well tCavalry will be ordered forward at once, to scout on the road from Monterey to Savannah, between Mickey's and its intersection with the Pittsburg-Purdy road. It will
onfederates were gathering in its front. Premising that General Grant kept his headquarters at Savannah, nine miles from Pittsburg by water and six or seven by land, and left a large discretion in th then, after dark, drew back to our lines, and reported the fact by letter to General Grant, at Savannah; but thus far we had not positively detected the presence of infantry, for cavalry regiments gerst communication is a telegram from General Grant to General Halleck, his commanding officer: Savannah, April 5, 1862. The main force of the enemy is at Corinth, with troops at different points eith 7,500 men kept at Crump's Landing, and Nelson and Crittenden's divisions-14,000 men-left at Savannah? Why the calm of Saturday and the confusion of Sunday? For the events of the battle, let the ieved to be still at Purdy. The advance of Buell's army, Nelson's division, had passed through Savannah on Saturday morning, April 5th, and was distant from Pittsburg about five miles on the north ba
was terrible fighting at Shiloh. Grant spent Saturday night at Savannah. His purpose was to meet and confer with Buell. But the sound oft you to your place on the field. General Buell had arrived at Savannah on Saturday evening, the 5th, having telegraphed General Grant to ken ashore. Buell also arranged with Grant to send steamers to Savannah, to bring up Crittenden's division. General Buell, in his offi command in the battle of the 6th: The impression existed at Savannah that the firing was only an affair of outposts, the same thing hav General Grant at the landing, I requested him to send steamers to Savannah to bring up General Crittenden's division, which had arrived durinl Nelson's division crossed, and General Crittenden's arrived from Savannah by steamers. Badeau says (page 84): A battery of artilleto orders from General Grant, reiterated by General Buell, he left Savannah at half-past 1 o'clock, and marched up the bank at Pittsburg Landi