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Frederick H. Dyer, Compendium of the War of the Rebellion: Regimental Histories 339 107 Browse Search
Robert Underwood Johnson, Clarence Clough Buell, Battles and Leaders of the Civil War: The Opening Battles. Volume 1. 78 0 Browse Search
Colonel William Preston Johnston, The Life of General Albert Sidney Johnston : His Service in the Armies of the United States, the Republic of Texas, and the Confederate States. 64 0 Browse Search
Official Records of the Union and Confederate Armies, Chapter XXII: Operations in Kentucky, Tennessee, North Mississippi, North Alabama, and Southwest Virginia. March 4-June 10, 1862., Part II: Correspondence, Orders, and Returns. (ed. Lieut. Col. Robert N. Scott) 47 1 Browse Search
Official Records of the Union and Confederate Armies, Chapter XXII: Operations in Kentucky, Tennessee, North Mississippi, North Alabama, and Southwest Virginia. March 4-June 10, 1862. (ed. Lieut. Col. Robert N. Scott) 44 6 Browse Search
Alfred Roman, The military operations of General Beauregard in the war between the states, 1861 to 1865 40 0 Browse Search
Benson J. Lossing, Pictorial Field Book of the Civil War. Volume 2. 34 0 Browse Search
Rebellion Record: a Diary of American Events: Documents and Narratives, Volume 4. (ed. Frank Moore) 32 4 Browse Search
Horace Greeley, The American Conflict: A History of the Great Rebellion in the United States of America, 1860-65: its Causes, Incidents, and Results: Intended to exhibit especially its moral and political phases with the drift and progress of American opinion respecting human slavery from 1776 to the close of the War for the Union. Volume II. 27 1 Browse Search
Comte de Paris, History of the Civil War in America. Vol. 1. (ed. Henry Coppee , LL.D.) 26 0 Browse Search
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Browsing named entities in Admiral David D. Porter, The Naval History of the Civil War.. You can also browse the collection for Savannah, Tenn. (Tennessee, United States) or search for Savannah, Tenn. (Tennessee, United States) in all documents.

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Admiral David D. Porter, The Naval History of the Civil War., Chapter 15: capture of Fort Donelson and battle of Shiloh. (search)
Tennessee, and preventing our armies from marching southward. On the 15th of February, Gen. Grant was assigned to the new military district of West Tennessee, with limits undefined, and Gen. W. T. Sherman to the command of the district of Cairo. Grant commenced at once to concentrate his forces and make his dispositions to meet the new order of defense established by the Confederates. His first step was to send Gens. Wright and McClernand up to Pittsburg, while he remained himself at Savannah, superintending the organization of the new troops which were arriving from Missouri, and making preparations to advance towards Pittsburg Landing (Shiloh). The account of the famous battle which soon occurred at this place must be left to military writers, but the battle of Shiloh with its changes of fortune from hour to hour, its keen anxieties. splendid fighting on both sides, and the splendid victory which was finally wrenched from the enemy after he had driven our troops back upon
Admiral David D. Porter, The Naval History of the Civil War., Chapter 30: (search)
mong which were three large cotton mills and magazines of corn; they also captured sixty-five prisoners. Meanwhile one hundred and fifty cavalry had landed at Savannah, under cover of the guns of the Covington, intending to operate in that neighborhood and keep open communication between Colonel Conger and the gun-boats. The Forest Rose and Robb covered the landing opposite Hamburg. The force at Savannah had captured some stock and brought it in; but on one occasion, while returning from an expedition, the commanding officer of the party, being pressed by a superior force of the enemy, abandoned his captured stock and barely succeeded in reaching SavaSavannah, where Lieutenant-Commander Phelps found his troops covered by the Covington. Colonel Bissel, the Confederate commander, had invested the town, and given one hour for the removal of the women and children before proceeding to the attack. The answer of the two Union commanders to this summons was, Come and take it. That