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Frederick H. Dyer, Compendium of the War of the Rebellion: Regimental Histories 125 1 Browse Search
Southern Historical Society Papers, Volume 22. (ed. Reverend J. William Jones) 116 2 Browse Search
L. P. Brockett, The camp, the battlefield, and the hospital: or, lights and shadows of the great rebellion 66 0 Browse Search
Rebellion Record: a Diary of American Events: Documents and Narratives, Volume 7. (ed. Frank Moore) 64 2 Browse Search
Comte de Paris, History of the Civil War in America. Vol. 4. (ed. Henry Coppee , LL.D.) 50 0 Browse Search
Official Records of the Union and Confederate Armies, Chapter XXII: Operations in Kentucky, Tennessee, North Mississippi, North Alabama, and Southwest Virginia. March 4-June 10, 1862. (ed. Lieut. Col. Robert N. Scott) 44 2 Browse Search
Official Records of the Union and Confederate Armies, Chapter XXII: Operations in Kentucky, Tennessee, North Mississippi, North Alabama, and Southwest Virginia. March 4-June 10, 1862., Part II: Correspondence, Orders, and Returns. (ed. Lieut. Col. Robert N. Scott) 39 1 Browse Search
Horace Greeley, The American Conflict: A History of the Great Rebellion in the United States of America, 1860-65: its Causes, Incidents, and Results: Intended to exhibit especially its moral and political phases with the drift and progress of American opinion respecting human slavery from 1776 to the close of the War for the Union. Volume II. 37 1 Browse Search
Col. O. M. Roberts, Confederate Military History, a library of Confederate States Military History: Volume 12.1, Alabama (ed. Clement Anselm Evans) 31 3 Browse Search
Lt.-Colonel Arthur J. Fremantle, Three Months in the Southern States 30 0 Browse Search
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Browsing named entities in Colonel William Preston Johnston, The Life of General Albert Sidney Johnston : His Service in the Armies of the United States, the Republic of Texas, and the Confederate States.. You can also browse the collection for Shelbyville, Tenn. (Tennessee, United States) or search for Shelbyville, Tenn. (Tennessee, United States) in all documents.

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rs and fugitives from Donelson, and moved through Shelbyville and Fayetteville on Decatur. Halting at those popurpose to move his army to Corinth by the way of Shelbyville and Decatur. As it has been suggested in certry supplies were left at Nashville, Murfreesboro, Shelbyville, Fayetteville, and Huntsville. Again, the movement was made over the metal roads leading to Shelbyville, Fayetteville, and Huntsville, as expeditiously, considy. The line of march from Murfreesboro through Shelbyville and Fayetteville to Decatur was a middle route beith five prisoners, through the enemy's lines, to Shelbyville. On the 28th of February, the army took up thlated at Murfreesboro, the pork and provisions at Shelbyville and other points, and their necessary protection dee, is protecting the removal of provisions from Shelbyville. Last evening his pickets were near Murfreesboroki, sending forward supplies; Morgan's cavalry at Shelbyville, ordered on. To-morrow, Breckinridge's brigad
have since become famous; aid it is not necessary to their reputations to show that they were infallible-especially, so early in their careers. If the testimony proves them somewhat at fault in wariness and sagacity, yet it shows them derelict only so far; and they certainly exhibited on the field a gallantry and persistence worthy of commendation. Buell seems to have advised General Halleck with very considerable accuracy and promptness of General Johnston's movements after he left Shelbyville, showing that he had greatly improved his means of information, and that the retreating army could not so effectually mask its movements as in Kentucky. In forming a plan of campaign, there was some diversity of opinion between Halleck and Buell as to details; but the main idea of dividing the Confederacy, by cutting the Memphis & Charleston Railroad near the Great Bend of the Tennessee, was essentially the same. There has been controversy as to the origin of this plan of campaign
dded such new levies as the Governors had in rendezvous, who in this emergency were sent to the front, even without arms, and a few regiments which were raised in response to General Beauregard's call. It will be remembered that General Johnston's plan of concentration at Corinth, long contemplated, had taken shape as soon as Donelson fell. On February 21st Mackall, adjutant-general, telegraphed to General Pillow, who was at Columbia, that General Johnston's retreat will be toward Shelbyville. On the same day orders were given to send Cleburne's regiment to Decatur. On February 24th General Johnston telegraphed President Davis: My movement has been delayed by a storm on the 22th, washing away pike and railroad-bridge at this place. Floyd, 2,500 strong, will march for Chattanooga to-morrow, to defend. This army will move on the 26th, by Decatur, for the valley of the Mississippi. Is in good condition and increasing in numbers. When his arrangements at Murfreesbor