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Frederick H. Dyer, Compendium of the War of the Rebellion: Regimental Histories 125 1 Browse Search
Southern Historical Society Papers, Volume 22. (ed. Reverend J. William Jones) 116 2 Browse Search
L. P. Brockett, The camp, the battlefield, and the hospital: or, lights and shadows of the great rebellion 66 0 Browse Search
Rebellion Record: a Diary of American Events: Documents and Narratives, Volume 7. (ed. Frank Moore) 64 2 Browse Search
Comte de Paris, History of the Civil War in America. Vol. 4. (ed. Henry Coppee , LL.D.) 50 0 Browse Search
Official Records of the Union and Confederate Armies, Chapter XXII: Operations in Kentucky, Tennessee, North Mississippi, North Alabama, and Southwest Virginia. March 4-June 10, 1862. (ed. Lieut. Col. Robert N. Scott) 44 2 Browse Search
Official Records of the Union and Confederate Armies, Chapter XXII: Operations in Kentucky, Tennessee, North Mississippi, North Alabama, and Southwest Virginia. March 4-June 10, 1862., Part II: Correspondence, Orders, and Returns. (ed. Lieut. Col. Robert N. Scott) 39 1 Browse Search
Horace Greeley, The American Conflict: A History of the Great Rebellion in the United States of America, 1860-65: its Causes, Incidents, and Results: Intended to exhibit especially its moral and political phases with the drift and progress of American opinion respecting human slavery from 1776 to the close of the War for the Union. Volume II. 37 1 Browse Search
Col. O. M. Roberts, Confederate Military History, a library of Confederate States Military History: Volume 12.1, Alabama (ed. Clement Anselm Evans) 31 3 Browse Search
Lt.-Colonel Arthur J. Fremantle, Three Months in the Southern States 30 0 Browse Search
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Browsing named entities in Rebellion Record: a Diary of American Events: Documents and Narratives, Volume 5. (ed. Frank Moore). You can also browse the collection for Shelbyville, Tenn. (Tennessee, United States) or search for Shelbyville, Tenn. (Tennessee, United States) in all documents.

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ching Wartrace, and finding that the Fourth Kentucky cavalry, Col. Smith, had been ordered to Shelbyville, I directed Col. Barnes to occupy that place with the Eighth Kentucky infantry, where it still remains. The Ninth Michigan moved on to Shelbyville, where it arrived at four P. M. Learning from scouts that the enemy was at Unionville, and moving northward, I telegraphed Col. Lester, of the T precaution near Wartrace; and after bivouacking for the night on the Fayetteville road, near Shelbyville, proceeded to Murfreesboro at daybreak on the fourth instant, by railway, with the Ninth Michhe Fourth Kentucky cavalry, Colonel Smith, having arrived with Gen. Dumont, and yourself from Shelbyville, and the third battalion of the Seventh Pennsylvania cavalry, with Col. Wynkoop from Nashvillrom Murfreesboro, I met this force returning, under the impression that I had been cut off at Shelbyville and needed reinforcements. I directed this force to turn back and unite with the one recentl
Doc. 64.-expedition to east-tennessee. Despatch from General Negley. Shelbyville, June 12. To Governor Andrew Johnson: our expedition into East-Tennessee has proved successful. We are returning with eighty prisoners, including a number of prominent officers; also captured a drove of cattle and a large quantity of horses intended for the rebel army. The defeat of Gen. Adams's rebel forces in Sweeden's Cove was much more complete than reported. He escaped without sword, hat, or horse. We silenced the enemy's batteries at Chattanooga on the evening of the seventh, after a fierce cannonading of three hours. We opened on the eighth at nine A. M., and continued six hours upon the town and rifle-pits, driving the enemy out and forcing him to abandon his works and evacuate the city. They burnt several railroad-bridges to prevent pursuit. The Union people in East-Tennessee are wild with joy. They meet us along the road by hundreds. I shall send you a number of their princi