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Rebellion Record: a Diary of American Events: Documents and Narratives, Volume 7. (ed. Frank Moore) 53 3 Browse Search
Official Records of the Union and Confederate Armies, Chapter XXII: Operations in Kentucky, Tennessee, North Mississippi, North Alabama, and Southwest Virginia. March 4-June 10, 1862., Part II: Correspondence, Orders, and Returns. (ed. Lieut. Col. Robert N. Scott) 22 0 Browse Search
Rebellion Record: a Diary of American Events: Documents and Narratives, Volume 5. (ed. Frank Moore) 18 2 Browse Search
Official Records of the Union and Confederate Armies, Chapter XXII: Operations in Kentucky, Tennessee, North Mississippi, North Alabama, and Southwest Virginia. March 4-June 10, 1862. (ed. Lieut. Col. Robert N. Scott) 14 0 Browse Search
Benson J. Lossing, Pictorial Field Book of the Civil War. Volume 3. 7 1 Browse Search
John Beatty, The Citizen-Soldier; or, Memoirs of a Volunteer 4 0 Browse Search
Southern Historical Society Papers, Volume 7. (ed. Reverend J. William Jones) 4 0 Browse Search
Philip Henry Sheridan, Personal Memoirs of P. H. Sheridan, General, United States Army . 4 0 Browse Search
Southern Historical Society Papers, Volume 9. (ed. Reverend J. William Jones) 4 0 Browse Search
Horace Greeley, The American Conflict: A History of the Great Rebellion in the United States of America, 1860-65: its Causes, Incidents, and Results: Intended to exhibit especially its moral and political phases with the drift and progress of American opinion respecting human slavery from 1776 to the close of the War for the Union. Volume II. 3 1 Browse Search
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Browsing named entities in Rebellion Record: a Diary of American Events: Documents and Narratives, Volume 5. (ed. Frank Moore). You can also browse the collection for Winchester (Tennessee, United States) or search for Winchester (Tennessee, United States) in all documents.

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thrown out as skirmishers, and the contest was for a while rather eager. An effort of the enemy to flank the position was repulsed with a loss of seven wounded, five of the Eighth Virginia and two of the Sixtieth Ohio, whose names are given below, with other casualties since occurred. The cannonade ceased about eleven o'clock, and was not renewed. It was soon known that only the rear-guard or flanking column of Jackson had been engaged, while his main force passed hurriedly on over the Winchester and Strasburgh road. But the wily rebel meant to run — not fight — and had succeeded in reaching Strasburgh just in season to pass between McDowell on the one side and Fremont on the other. I know nothing of the movements of the former, except that his advance-guard reached Strasburgh next morning, twelve hours after it had been entered by Col. Cluseret, but it is certain no efforts could have accelerated the march of the column under Gen. Fremont. Cluseret was ordered on, entered S
ciated by our Commanding General. He is a Pennsylvanian, and reflects great honor on the old Keystone State. He found no rebel forces between Fayetteville and Winchester. On reaching Winchester, he learned that the rebel General Adams was in command of a heavy force of rebels at Jasper, some thirty miles distant. He at once dWinchester, he learned that the rebel General Adams was in command of a heavy force of rebels at Jasper, some thirty miles distant. He at once determined to surprise them. In order to do this, he was compelled to make a forced march, some twenty miles, over a rough, mountainous country. His was accomplished. He soon discovered their pickets, and by a well-laid plan, succeeded in capturing them. He immediately moved on, and within a few miles of Jasper, came upon a larlts, as this gallant charge of the daring Kentuckians and brave Pennsylvanians, led on by such as Haggard and Wyncoop. Col. Hambright, who led the advance from Winchester to Jasper, and received the enemy's first fire, displayed great courage and coolness. Who will dare say that this foul rebellion will not be forever crushed,
ed his march and proceeded to Salem, where he arrived the same day. The next day he reached Winchester. It had been reported that the rebels were in considerable force in that place, and the Sevento the confederate army or be hanged. He was also the principal of a large female seminary in Winchester, which seems to be still in full operation, educating the feminine youth of the locality in thecessionism. Trimble was subsequently sent to Gen. Mitchel, at Huntsville. Passing through Winchester, Gen. Negley encamped his forces at a place called Cowan, on the Nashville and Chattanooga Raiat a portion of Gen. Mitchel's forces, under Gen. Lytle, was approaching this point from Winchester, Tennessee, where they had been committing all kinds of robbery and outrage. On Wednesday, the fouiment, at Sweden's Cove, about thirty miles north-west of this place, on the road leading from Winchester to Jasper. He made his escape with the loss of only six men, instead of twenty, as reported
Doc. 157.-fight at Trinity, Alabama. Colonel Walker's report. headquarters Thirty-First Ohio volunteers, Winchester, Tenn., August 8. Adjutant-General Charles W. Hill: General: I beg leave to report that at about four o'clock on the afternoon of the twenty-fourth ult., Lieut. M. B. W. Harman, in command of company E, Thirty-first O. V. I., with one platoon of his company, numbering twenty-five men, including non-commissioned officers, who were stationed at a place called Trinity, near Decatur, Ala., for the purpose of guarding the Memphis and Charleston Ralroad, were attacked by a force of rebel cavalry, which numbered about three hundred and fifty men. The attack was made when Lieut. Harman and his little band were engaged in erecting a stockade-fort, and they were without immediate possession of their arms, which were stacked near at hand. At the first fire they sprang to their arms and commenced the most Spartan-like resistance which the history of this war, so far,