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Frederick H. Dyer, Compendium of the War of the Rebellion: Regimental Histories 21 1 Browse Search
The Photographic History of The Civil War: in ten volumes, Thousands of Scenes Photographed 1861-65, with Text by many Special Authorities, Volume 1: The Opening Battles. (ed. Francis Trevelyan Miller) 20 0 Browse Search
Rebellion Record: a Diary of American Events: Documents and Narratives, Volume 5. (ed. Frank Moore) 12 0 Browse Search
Horace Greeley, The American Conflict: A History of the Great Rebellion in the United States of America, 1860-65: its Causes, Incidents, and Results: Intended to exhibit especially its moral and political phases with the drift and progress of American opinion respecting human slavery from 1776 to the close of the War for the Union. Volume II. 8 0 Browse Search
William Hepworth Dixon, White Conquest: Volume 1 6 0 Browse Search
The Photographic History of The Civil War: in ten volumes, Thousands of Scenes Photographed 1861-65, with Text by many Special Authorities, Volume 5: Forts and Artillery. (ed. Francis Trevelyan Miller) 6 0 Browse Search
Comte de Paris, History of the Civil War in America. Vol. 2. (ed. Henry Coppee , LL.D.) 6 0 Browse Search
The Photographic History of The Civil War: in ten volumes, Thousands of Scenes Photographed 1861-65, with Text by many Special Authorities, Volume 3: The Decisive Battles. (ed. Francis Trevelyan Miller) 4 0 Browse Search
The Daily Dispatch: April 5, 1862., [Electronic resource] 4 0 Browse Search
The Photographic History of The Civil War: in ten volumes, Thousands of Scenes Photographed 1861-65, with Text by many Special Authorities, Index (ed. Francis Trevelyan Miller) 4 0 Browse Search
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Browsing named entities in The Photographic History of The Civil War: in ten volumes, Thousands of Scenes Photographed 1861-65, with Text by many Special Authorities, Volume 1: The Opening Battles. (ed. Francis Trevelyan Miller). You can also browse the collection for Jacksboro (Texas, United States) or search for Jacksboro (Texas, United States) in all documents.

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Preface 2; the photographic record as history George Haven Putnam, Adjutant and Brevet Major 176th New York Volunteer Infantry With the defenders of Washington in 1862; the sally-port at Fort Richardson History brought again into the present tense : Confederate earthworks before Atlanta, 1864 The value of The photographic record as history is emphasized in the contribution from Mr. George Haven Putnam on page 60. This photograph of a dramatic scene was taken on a July day afPotomac, the troops of General Grant were placing the Stars and Stripes over the well-defended works of Vicksburg. A beautiful little picture recalls the sharp fight that was made, on July 2, 1863, for the possession of Little Round Fort Richardson-drill at the big guns, 1862 Officers of the fifty-fifth New York Volunteers Defenses of Washington-Camp of the first Connecticut heavy Artillery. Here we see some of the guardians of the city of Washington, which was threatened i
r up the river were hauled along a well-traveled road which bisected this stretch of encampment. This road, called New Kent Road, was the main highway of the region and led to Richmond. A vista of the Federal camp. The Army of the Potomac waiting for the expected victorious advance on the Confederate capital. Yorktown had been evacuated on May 4th and Williamsburg abandoned on May 5th to the Union forces. During the week following, the divisions of Franklin, Sedgwick, Porter, and Richardson, after some opposition, gathered on the banks of the Pamunkey, the southern branch of the York River. Thence they marched toward White House which — after communication with the divisions that had been fighting at Williamsburg, was established — became headquarters for the whole army. This panoramic view shows a part of the encampment. Idle days at Cumberland. The farm-lands occupied by the impatient, waiting army were soon stripped of fences for firewood. The men sat idly about,
ich were needed for the battle of the two following days. During the night of May 31st Pettit's command dragged their guns through the mud up from the river to Richardson's division on the right of the Federal line near the railroad; caisson and gun carriage had sunk to the very hubs, as their condition shows. Of all the artilles Station the day was saved, too, in the nick of time, for the Federals. On the north side of the Chickahominy were stationed the two divisions of Sedgwick and Richardson, under command of General Sumner. Scarcely had the battle opened when McClellan at his headquarters, six miles away, heard the roar and rattle of artillery. Heneral G. W. Smith. Early Sunday morning the battle was again in progress. The command of Smith, near Fair Oaks Station, advanced down the railroad, attacking Richardson, whose lines were north of it and were using the embankment as a fortification. Longstreet's men were south of the railroad. The firing was heavy all along th
In the Shenandoah Valley and the alarm of Washington. Henry W. Elson June, 1862-McClellan's men drilling within five miles of Richmond, ignorant of Jackson's movements from the Valley, so soon to result in their repulse — Richardson's entrenchments south of Fort Sumner Men Jackson could afford to lose: Confederate prisoners captured in the Shenandoah These two hundred Confederate soldiers captured the day after Stonewall Jackson's victory at Front Royal, were an insignificant reprisal for the damage done to the Federal cause by that dashing and fearless Confederate leader. When Richmond was threatened both by land and water in May, 1862, Johnston sent Jackson to create a diversion and alarm the Federal capital. Rushing down the Valley of the Shenandoah, his forces threatened to cut off and overwhelm those of General Banks, who immediately began a retreat. It became a race between the two armies down the Valley toward Winchester and Harper's Ferry. Forced marches
n of refuge, these men were being railroaded toward the field of carnage, where they must of necessity be left by their retreating companions. The stand at Savage's Station Here we see part of the encampment to hold which the divisions of Richardson, Sedgwick, Smith, and Franklin fought valiantly when Magruder and the Confederates fell upon them, June 29, 1862. Along the Richmond & York River Railroad, seen in the picture, the Confederates rolled a heavy rifled gun, mounted on car-wheels.1862. On the morning of the 30th, the rear-guard of the army was hastily tramping after them, and by ten o'clock had safely crossed and destroyed the bridge. They had escaped in the nick of time, for at noon Stonewall Jackson opened fire upon Richardson's division and a terrific artillery battle ensued for the possession of this, the single crossing by which it Was possible to attack McClellan's rear. The Federal batteries were compelled to retire but Jackson's crossing was prevented on that
The Photographic History of The Civil War: in ten volumes, Thousands of Scenes Photographed 1861-65, with Text by many Special Authorities, Volume 1: The Opening Battles. (ed. Francis Trevelyan Miller), Engagements of the Civil War with losses on both sides December, 1860-August, 1862 (search)
Gap, Tenn. By Confederates of Gen. C. L. Stevenson's command, and occupation by Gen. G. W. Morgan's Federal division. June 18, 1862: Williamsburg road, Va. Union, 16th Mass. Confed. No record found. Losses: Union 17 killed, 28 wounded, 14 captured. Confed. 5 killed, 9 wounded. June 25, 1862: Oak Grove, Va., also called Kings school House and the Orchards. Union, Hooker's and Kearney's Divisions of the Third Corps, Palmer's Brigade of the Fourth Corps, and part of Richardson's Division of the Second Corps. Confed., Armistead's brigade. Losses: Union 51 killed, 401 wounded, 64 missing. Confed. 65 killed, 465 wounded, 11 missing. June 26-29, 1862: Vicksburg, Miss. U. S. Fleet, under command of Commodore Farragut, passed the Confederate land batteries, under the cover of bombardment by Commodore Porter's fleet of mortar boats. June 2, 1862 to July 1, 1862: the Seven days Battles, in front of Richmond, Va., including engagements known as Mecha