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Document Max. Freq Min. Freq
Official Records of the Union and Confederate Armies, Chapter XXII: Operations in Kentucky, Tennessee, North Mississippi, North Alabama, and Southwest Virginia. March 4-June 10, 1862., Part II: Correspondence, Orders, and Returns. (ed. Lieut. Col. Robert N. Scott) 20 2 Browse Search
Southern Historical Society Papers, Volume 20. (ed. Reverend J. William Jones) 17 7 Browse Search
Comte de Paris, History of the Civil War in America. Vol. 4. (ed. Henry Coppee , LL.D.) 12 0 Browse Search
Southern Historical Society Papers, Volume 17. (ed. Reverend J. William Jones) 12 0 Browse Search
Official Records of the Union and Confederate Armies, Chapter XXII: Operations in Kentucky, Tennessee, North Mississippi, North Alabama, and Southwest Virginia. March 4-June 10, 1862. (ed. Lieut. Col. Robert N. Scott) 10 0 Browse Search
Harper's Encyclopedia of United States History (ed. Benson Lossing) 8 4 Browse Search
Southern Historical Society Papers, Volume 7. (ed. Reverend J. William Jones) 8 0 Browse Search
Edward Alfred Pollard, The lost cause; a new Southern history of the War of the Confederates ... Drawn from official sources and approved by the most distinguished Confederate leaders. 8 2 Browse Search
The Daily Dispatch: December 30, 1861., [Electronic resource] 8 0 Browse Search
Col. J. Stoddard Johnston, Confederate Military History, a library of Confederate States Military History: Volume 9.1, Kentucky (ed. Clement Anselm Evans) 8 4 Browse Search
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Browsing named entities in Harper's Encyclopedia of United States History (ed. Benson Lossing). You can also browse the collection for Abingdon, Va. (Virginia, United States) or search for Abingdon, Va. (Virginia, United States) in all documents.

Your search returned 6 results in 6 document sections:

Harper's Encyclopedia of United States History (ed. Benson Lossing), Abingdon, (search)
Abingdon, A town in Washington county, Va., 315 miles southwest of Richmond. It contains Abingdon Academy, the Academy of the Visitation, Martha Washington College, and Stonewall Jackson Female Institute; has valuable deposits of salt, iron, and gypsum, and is noted as being the place from which the greater part of the salt used in the Southern States and the Confederate army during the Civil War was obtained.
Harper's Encyclopedia of United States History (ed. Benson Lossing), Blair, Francis Preston, 1791-1876 (search)
Blair, Francis Preston, 1791-1876 Statesman: born in Abingdon, Va., April 12, 1791 was originally a supporter of Henry Clay, but became an ardent Jackson man in consequence of the agitation over the Bank of the United States (q. c.), and at the suggestion of the President established The globe in Washington, D. C., which was the recognized organ of the Democratic party until 1845, when President Polk displaced him. The Spanish mission was offered to Mr. Blair by the President, but refused. In 1864 his efforts led to the unsatisfactory peace conference of Feb. 3, 1865. He died in Silver Spring, Md., Oct. 18., 1876.
Harper's Encyclopedia of United States History (ed. Benson Lossing), Floyd, John Buchanan 1807- (search)
seventy-one columbiads and seven 32-pounders to be sent from the same arsenal to an embryo fort at Galveston, Tex., which would not be ready for armament in five years. When Quartermaster Taliaferro (a Virginian) was about to send off these heavy guns, an immense public meeting of citizens, called by the mayor, was held, and the guns were retained. When Floyd fled from Washington his successor, Joseph Holt, of Kentucky, countermanded the order. Indicted by the grand jury of the District of Columbia as being privy to the abstracting of $870,000 in bonds from the Department of the Interior, at the close of 1860 he fled to Virginia, when he was commissioned a general in the Confederate army. In that capacity he was driven from West Virginia by General Rosecrans. The night before the surrender of Fort Donelson (q. v.) he stole away in the darkness, and, being censured by the Confederate government, he never served in the army afterwards. He died near Abingdon, Va., Aug. 26, 1863.
Harper's Encyclopedia of United States History (ed. Benson Lossing), Government, instrument of. (search)
of thirty; and the persons to be chosen to sit in Parliament for Ireland shall be, and not exceed, the number of thirty. X. That the persons to be elected to sit in Parliament from time to time, for the several counties of England, Wales, the Isles of Jersey and Guernsey, and the town of Berwick-upon-Tweed, and all places within the same respectively, shall be according to the proportions and numbers hereafter expressed: that is to say, Bedfordshire, 5; Bedford Town, 1; Berkshire, 5; Abingdon, 1; Reading, 1; Buckinghamshire, 5; Buckingham Town, 1; Aylesbury, 1; Wycomb, 1; Cambridgeshire, 4; Cambridge Town, 1; Cambridge University, 1; Isle of Ely, 2; Cheshire, 4; Chester, 1; Cornwall, 8; Launceston, 1; Truro, 1; Penryn, 1; East Looe and West Looe, 1 Cumberland, 2; Carlisle, 1; Derbyshire, 4 Derby Town, 1; Devonshire, 11; Exeter, 2; Plymouth, 2; Clifton, Dartmouth, Hardness, 1; Totnes, 1; Barnstable, 1; Tiverton, 1; Honiton, 1; Dorsetshire, 6; Dorchester, 1; Weymouth and Melcomb-
Harper's Encyclopedia of United States History (ed. Benson Lossing), United States of America. (search)
863 Samuel Houston dies at Huntersville, Tex., aged seventy......July 25, 1863 John J. Crittenden dies at Frankfort, Ky., aged seventy-seven......July 26, 1863 President Lincoln proclaims protection of colored soldiers against retaliation by the Confederates......July 30, 1863 Governor Seymour, of New York, requests President Lincoln to suspend the draft for troops in that State......Aug. 3, 1863 John B. Floyd, ex-Secretary of War and Confederate brigadier-general, dies at Abingdon, Va.......Aug. 26, 1863 Army of the Cumberland crosses the Tennessee in pursuit of General Bragg......Aug. 29–Sept. 3, 1863 Advance of General Burnside's command occupies Knoxville, E. Tenn.......Sept. 4, 1863 Confederates evacuate Fort Wagner on the night of......Sept. 7, 1863 General Wood's division of the 21st Corps, Army of the Cumberland, occupies Chattanooga, Tenn.......Sept. 9, 1863 President Lincoln suspends the writ of habeas corpus by proclamation......Sept. 15, 1863
Harper's Encyclopedia of United States History (ed. Benson Lossing), Weeping-willow, the (search)
blished his villa at Twickenham. He planted the twig (fortunately) by the shore of the Thames, not knowing of what tree it was. It grew, and was a weeping-willow, such as the captive Jews wept under on the banks of the rivers of Babylon. That twig was planted in 1722. In 1775 one of the young British officers who came to Boston with the British army brought a twig from Pope's then huge willow, expecting, when the rebellion should be crushed, in a few weeks, to settle in America on some confiscated lands of the rebels, where he would plant his willow. John Parke Custis, son of Mrs. Washington, and aide to General Washington, at Cambridge, going on errands to the British camp, under a flag of truce, became acquainted with the owner of the willow twig (which was wrapped in oiled Pohick Church. silk). The disappointed subaltern gave the twig to Custis, who planted it near his home on his estate at Abingdon, Va., where it became the progenitor of all the weeping-willows in America.