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Southern Historical Society Papers, Volume 33. (ed. Reverend J. William Jones), Some of the drug conditions during the war between the States, 1861-5. (search)
ffee sold in New York and Boston the past twenty-five years has been composed chiefly of rye. Cotton-seed decoction was used for inflammation in mucous passages. The roots of the cotton plant were employed in asthma, and by the negroes as an abortant. Soap was made from cotton seed by treating them direct with lye. Among the substitutes for tea were Ceanothus Americanus, known as red root, or New Jersey tea, and holly leaves and blackberry and raspberry leaves and rose leaves. The Amelia azedarach (China berry) furnished some valuable uses. The berries were employed in making whiskey; the bark of the root used as an anthelmintic. The leaves were said to prevent botts in horses, and were used to pack with dried fruits to preserve them from ravages of insects. A soap was made from the berries, called Poor Man's Soap. The ox-eyed daisy was used in place of Persian insect powder—an insecticide used as far back as 1857. In the country, fresh elderberry leaves were laid ne