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Frederick H. Dyer, Compendium of the War of the Rebellion: Regimental Histories 486 0 Browse Search
Benjamnin F. Butler, Butler's Book: Autobiography and Personal Reminiscences of Major-General Benjamin Butler 112 0 Browse Search
William F. Fox, Lt. Col. U. S. V., Regimental Losses in the American Civil War, 1861-1865: A Treatise on the extent and nature of the mortuary losses in the Union regiments, with full and exhaustive statistics compiled from the official records on file in the state military bureaus and at Washington 106 0 Browse Search
Robert Underwood Johnson, Clarence Clough Buell, Battles and Leaders of the Civil War. Volume 4. 88 0 Browse Search
Benson J. Lossing, Pictorial Field Book of the Civil War. Volume 3. 60 0 Browse Search
William Swinton, Campaigns of the Army of the Potomac 58 0 Browse Search
Rebellion Record: a Diary of American Events: Documents and Narratives, Volume 11. (ed. Frank Moore) 46 0 Browse Search
Adam Badeau, Military history of Ulysses S. Grant from April 1861 to April 1865. Volume 3 44 0 Browse Search
Adam Badeau, Military history of Ulysses S. Grant from April 1861 to April 1865. Volume 2 44 0 Browse Search
Brigadier-General Ellison Capers, Confederate Military History, a library of Confederate States Military History: Volume 5, South Carolina (ed. Clement Anselm Evans) 40 0 Browse Search
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Browsing named entities in Admiral David D. Porter, The Naval History of the Civil War.. You can also browse the collection for Bermuda Hundred (Virginia, United States) or search for Bermuda Hundred (Virginia, United States) in all documents.

Your search returned 6 results in 2 document sections:

Admiral David D. Porter, The Naval History of the Civil War., Chapter 39: Miscellaneous operations, land and sea.--operations in the Nansemond, Cape Fear, Pamunky, Chucka Tuck and James Rivers.--destruction of blockade-runners.--adventures of Lieutenant Cushing, etc. (search)
iver. boat expedition up Chuckatuck Creek. attack on Minnesota by torpedo-boat. Landing of Army at City Point and Bermuda hundred. destruction of U. S. Gun-boat Commodore Jones. Confederate torpedo defences. Monitors engage Howlett's battery. lished without difficulty. Having been joined by General Gillmore on the 4th of May, Butler occupied City Point and Bermuda Hundred on the 5th; on the 6th he was in position with his main force and intrenched, and on the 7th made a reconnaissance ost., and had gone thence to Richmond. On the 5th of May, the army, under General Butler, landed at City Point and Bermuda Hundred, covered by five iron-clads and ten other vessels, without opposition. The river had been carefully dragged for tor obstruct the James River by sinking vessels a mile or so below Howlett's Battery. This would make his positions at Bermuda Hundred and at City Point perfectly secure. Part of the vessels to be used for this purpose were received by Acting-Rear-Ad
Admiral David D. Porter, The Naval History of the Civil War., Chapter 51: effects of the fall of Fort Fisher, and criticisms on General Badeau's military history of General Grant. (search)
tence until he read General Butler's published official report of the Fort Fisher failure, with my indorsement and papers accompanying it. I had no idea of General Butler's accompanying the expedition until the evening before it got off from Bermuda Hundred, and then did not dream but that General Weitzel had received all the instructions and would be in command. I rather formed the idea that General Butler was actuated by a desire to witness the effect of the explosion of the powder-boat. as not possessed by the Commander of the James. He therefore directed Butler to place Weitzel in command of the expedition, and had, in fact, committed to Butler movements in support of those of Meade, which he intended should detain him in Bermuda Hundred. Nevertheless, he did not now forbid Butler to accompany Weitzel. It was difficult thus to affront a commander of such high rank unless it was intended to relieve him entirely from command, and this Grant was not prepared to do without c