Browsing named entities in Rebellion Record: a Diary of American Events, Diary from December 17, 1860 - April 30, 1864 (ed. Frank Moore). You can also browse the collection for Snickersville (Virginia, United States) or search for Snickersville (Virginia, United States) in all documents.

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f Union troops under the command of Lieutenant-Colonel Quirk, and a detachment of the rebel General Stuart's cavalry, resulting in a rout of the latter and the capture of sixteen of their number, with about two hundred head of cattle which the rebels were driving to their camp.--(Doc. 18.) Early this morning a force of Union troops under the command of Major Keenan, Eighth Pennsylvania cavalry, left Purcellsville, Va., on a reconnoitring expedition. They passed through Berrysville, Snickersville, and Philomont. On arriving at Union they found that town occupied by a battalion of Georgia cavalry, whom they drove out. Here it was ascertained that General Walker, in command of a force of South-Carolina troops, was in position five miles from Middleburgh. Major Keenan also found about a hundred wounded rebel soldiers, all of whom he paroled, and learned that General Longstreet was in command of the rebel forces near Upperville. He next proceeded to Aldie, in the vicinity of which
Church, about fifteen miles from Falmouth, Va., the first and third squadrons of the Third Pennsylvania cavalry, belonging to General Averill's brigade, were suddenly attacked by a numerically superior force of rebel cavalry, and after a brief resistance, in which four of the Unionists were killed and nine wounded, were finally taken prisoners. An important reconnoissance was this day made by a large Union force under the command of General Stahel, to Upperville, Paris, Ashby's Gap, Snickersville, Berryville, etc.--(Doc. 50.) An expedition consisting of five thousand infantry and two thousand cavalry, under the command of General A. P. Hovey, yesterday left Helena, Ark., and to-day arrived at Delta, Miss., for the purpose of cutting the road and telegraph wires, on the Tennessee and Mississippi railroads, and creating a panic in the rebel forces under General Price. Bridges on both roads were destroyed, together with two locomotives and thirty or forty freight-cars.--The ca