Browsing named entities in Historic leaves, volume 6, April, 1907 - January, 1908. You can also browse the collection for Broadway (Virginia, United States) or search for Broadway (Virginia, United States) in all documents.

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ny important question. He was a frequent contributor to the Somerville Journal and other publications, writing with a clear and vigorous style. Having a good memory, he was able to repeat many passages from the best literature. He was literary in his tastes, and was particularly fond of his library. The funeral services were held on Saturday, March 11, 1905, at 1 p. m. from his home, 17 Dartmouth street. The city flags were placed at half-mast, and from 12 to 2 o'clock the stores on Broadway in the vicinity of his office were closed. The services were conducted by Rev. Horace H. Leavitt, pastor of the Broadway Congregational church, of which Mr. Pillsbury was a member for many years; Rev. Charles L. Noyes, pastor of the Winter Hill Congregational church, a long-time friend; and Rev. Francis Gray, pastor of the Winter Hill Universalist church, his next neighbor. The sentiments of affection and esteem which were feelingly expressed at the funeral service and were spread upon
Historic leaves, volume 6, April, 1907 - January, 1908, Original English inhabitants and early settlers in Somerville. (search)
t this time, our territory will be designated as Somerville. The local names within our borders in the early time were the Ten Hills Farm, between what is now Broadway and the Mystic, and from Medford town line to about where Winthrop Avenue connects with Broadway the line extended by a creek to the river; but the larger part of the farm was outside of our limits. The Highfield and Highfield-mead included all the remaining territory between Broadway and the river: but a part of the Highfield was on the Charlestown side of our boundary line. The Stinted Pasture, or Cow Commons, was from Broadway toward Cambridge, and north from the Road to Cambridge, Broadway toward Cambridge, and north from the Road to Cambridge, now Washington Street, and comprised a large part of Somerville. Gibbons-field, the South-mead and the West End were south of the Road to Cambridge, and westerly of what is now the Southern division of the Boston and Maine Railroad. Strawberry Hill was probably the same as our Prospect Hill. Lastly, there can hardly be a doubt
Historic leaves, volume 6, April, 1907 - January, 1908, Original English inhabitants and early settlers in Somerville.—(Ii.) (search)
became extinct here in the third generation. William Rand, 1758, was in the fifth generation of the Robert Rand family. He had two sons, William, who may have lived in Woburn, and Thomas, who lived in Somerville. Descendants here are all through Thomas, thirteen in number. Peleg Stearns, 1761, had a homestead and possessions in the Highfield. His only child, Dr. William Stearns, married Sarah White Sprague, and they had nine children. The homestead was on the northeasterly side of Broadway, near the Charlestown line, and the house is still standing. Besides their possessions in the Highfield, they had land on the southerly side of Washington street, near the Charlestown line, and in Polly's Swamp. Two of the descendants of Peleg Stearns are now in Somerville. Joseph Adams, 1770, was of the fifth generation of the John Adams family, of Cambridge, arid the fourth Joseph in lineal descent. Two Josephs in lineal descent followed him. He lived on the northwesterly slope of Wi