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Philip Henry Sheridan, Personal Memoirs of P. H. Sheridan, General, United States Army . 24 0 Browse Search
General Horace Porter, Campaigning with Grant 24 0 Browse Search
Robert Underwood Johnson, Clarence Clough Buell, Battles and Leaders of the Civil War. Volume 4. 18 0 Browse Search
The Atlanta (Georgia) Campaign: May 1 - September 8, 1864., Part I: General Report. (ed. Maj. George B. Davis, Mr. Leslie J. Perry, Mr. Joseph W. Kirkley) 16 0 Browse Search
Joshua Lawrence Chamberlain, The Passing of the Armies: The Last Campaign of the Armies. 16 0 Browse Search
Fitzhugh Lee, General Lee 10 0 Browse Search
Southern Historical Society Papers, Volume 25. (ed. Reverend J. William Jones) 8 0 Browse Search
Colonel Theodore Lyman, With Grant and Meade from the Wilderness to Appomattox (ed. George R. Agassiz) 7 1 Browse Search
General James Longstreet, From Manassas to Appomattox 6 0 Browse Search
Maj. Jed. Hotchkiss, Confederate Military History, a library of Confederate States Military History: Volume 3, Virginia (ed. Clement Anselm Evans) 4 0 Browse Search
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Browsing named entities in Southern Historical Society Papers, Volume 25. (ed. Reverend J. William Jones). You can also browse the collection for Burkeville (Virginia, United States) or search for Burkeville (Virginia, United States) in all documents.

Your search returned 4 results in 2 document sections:

Southern Historical Society Papers, Volume 25. (ed. Reverend J. William Jones), The Cumberland Grays, Company D, Twenty-first Virginia Infantry. (search)
of the probability of the evacuation, I asked the reason for the order. None was given, and our construction of it then was that Richmond had news of a raid out from the Federal army, and that it was feared that our lines would be cut between Burkeville and the Staunton river. We took our local wire and interrogated the operators on the line for news of the raiders, but they knew nothing. It was time for the regular passenger train to leave for Richmond. Many passengers were gathering, anrtermaster of the 5th Army Corps. Numerous questions were put and answered in regard to the Richmond and Danville and Piedmont roads and its rolling stock, and we were astonished to be asked to gather our men and open up communications between Burkeville and Danville and Greensboroa, for the purpose of handling supplies for the Federal army at Greensboroa and Danville, and other purposes. We were told to take our own men to man the trains and engines, and none of the men who worked for Major
Southern Historical Society Papers, Volume 25. (ed. Reverend J. William Jones), chapter 1.29 (search)
of the probability of the evacuation, I asked the reason for the order. None was given, and our construction of it then was that Richmond had news of a raid out from the Federal army, and that it was feared that our lines would be cut between Burkeville and the Staunton river. We took our local wire and interrogated the operators on the line for news of the raiders, but they knew nothing. It was time for the regular passenger train to leave for Richmond. Many passengers were gathering, anrtermaster of the 5th Army Corps. Numerous questions were put and answered in regard to the Richmond and Danville and Piedmont roads and its rolling stock, and we were astonished to be asked to gather our men and open up communications between Burkeville and Danville and Greensboroa, for the purpose of handling supplies for the Federal army at Greensboroa and Danville, and other purposes. We were told to take our own men to man the trains and engines, and none of the men who worked for Major