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Robert Underwood Johnson, Clarence Clough Buell, Battles and Leaders of the Civil War: Volume 2. 48 0 Browse Search
Robert Underwood Johnson, Clarence Clough Buell, Battles and Leaders of the Civil War. Volume 3. 46 0 Browse Search
General James Longstreet, From Manassas to Appomattox 18 0 Browse Search
Rebellion Record: a Diary of American Events, Diary from December 17, 1860 - April 30, 1864 (ed. Frank Moore) 14 4 Browse Search
Fitzhugh Lee, General Lee 14 0 Browse Search
An English Combatant, Lieutenant of Artillery of the Field Staff., Battlefields of the South from Bull Run to Fredericksburgh; with sketches of Confederate commanders, and gossip of the camps. 12 0 Browse Search
Jubal Anderson Early, Ruth Hairston Early, Lieutenant General Jubal A. Early , C. S. A. 6 0 Browse Search
Robert Lewis Dabney, Life and Commands of Lieutenand- General Thomas J. Jackson 6 0 Browse Search
The Annals of the Civil War Written by Leading Participants North and South (ed. Alexander Kelly McClure) 6 0 Browse Search
Judith White McGuire, Diary of a southern refugee during the war, by a lady of Virginia 4 0 Browse Search
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Browsing named entities in Fitzhugh Lee, General Lee. You can also browse the collection for Franklin, Va. (Virginia, United States) or search for Franklin, Va. (Virginia, United States) in all documents.

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Fitzhugh Lee, General Lee, Chapter 7: Atlantic coast defenses.-assigned to duty in Richmond as commander in chief under the direction of the Southern President. (search)
son April 14th, and assumed command on the 17th. His advance did not arrive at Yorktown till the 10th, the other divisions following a few days later. For six days McClellan was in front of Magruder before Johnston's arrival, but instead of assaulting, he commenced arrangements for a dilatory siege. Johnston, upon the arrival of all of his troops, had, together with Magruder's forces, fifty-three thousand men; McClellan one hundred and thirty-three thousand, including twelve thousand of Franklin's division on board of transports in readiness to move up York River. He sat down in front of Magruder's position to await the arrival of his siege trains, and began the construction of scaling ladders, which might be useful to assault permanent works, and the erection of batteries for his heavy guns, much to the annoyance of the Washington authorities, for the falling back of his opponents to new intrenched lines in rear would render useless his great guns and his great labor in getting t
Fitzhugh Lee, General Lee, Chapter 8: commands the army defending Richmond, and seven days battles. (search)
gry roar of their cannon. Upon his shoulders rested the safety of his capital. With quiet dignity he assumed his duties. The troops were immediately ordered back to their former stations, and the battle of Seven Pines was confided to the Muse of History. The next move on the military chessboard absorbed his immediate attention. The strongly constructed battle lines of his powerful enemy were uncomfortably close. McClellan had already commenced to strengthen his front at Seven Pines. Franklin's corps was brought from the north to the south side of the Chickahominy and posted on the right of that portion of his line. On the left was Sumner, and to his left Heintzelman extended as far as the White Oak swamp. In their rear Keyes was in reserve. On the north or left bank of the Chickahominy Fitz John Porter's corps was still stationed, near Gaines Mill, with McCall's division of Pennsylvania reserves at Mechanicsville and on Beaver Dam Creek-eleven divisions in all. Richmond, Mc-
Fitzhugh Lee, General Lee, Chapter 9: Second battle of Manassas. (search)
nce, reveled in these enormous stores, consisting of car loads of provisions, boxes of clothing, sutler's stores containing everything from French mustard to cavalry boots. Early that morning Taylor's New Jersey brigade, of Slocum's division of Franklin's corps, which had been transported by rail from Alexandria to Bull Run for the purpose of attacking what was presumed to be a small cavalry raid, got off the cars and marched in line of battle across the open plain to Manassas. Fitz Lee, who entreville heights. He had been reenforced by the corps of Franklin, which arrived on the 30th, and Sumner on the 31st, and the divisions of Cox and Sturgis. These two latter amounted to seventeen thousand men, and the infantry of Sumner's and Franklin's corps to twenty-five thousand. The march of these troops and their junction with Pope had been reported to General Lee by the cavalry, under Fitz Lee, which, having left Manassas the day of Jackson's arrival there, had penetrated the country
Fitzhugh Lee, General Lee, Chapter 10: Sharpsburg and Fredericksburg. (search)
ple time to prepare for battle. During the night of the 11th and succeeding day Sumner's two corps, with one hundred and four cannon, crossed at the upper, and Franklin's two corps, with one hundred and sixteen guns, crossed at the lower bridge, and by the night of the 12th Burnside's army was in readiness for the attack. His pe line between would have to retire or be crushed. He increased Sumner's troops to about sixty thousand, and added Butterfield's corps and Whipple's division to Franklin's command, giving him about forty thousand; At 5.55 A. M. on the 13th, the day of battle, he sent orders to Franklin — which he received two hours and a half aftntrated attack. Sumner's right grand division held the town. Couch's Second Corps occupied it, and Wilcox's Ninth Corps stretched out from Couch's left toward Franklin's right. At 8.15 A. M. Couch received an order from Sumner, who was across the river at the Lacy House, to form a column of a division for the purpose of seizin