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r of the rebel videttes, General Gregg pointed out what he supposed to be a long line of intrenchments, but which afterward proved to be the embankment of the unfinished railroad projected several years since to run between Fredericksburgh and Gordonsville. General Warren forthwith ordered up General Caldwell's division, effecting his movements without the knowledge of the enemy, and deployed the Irish brigade to the right and Colonel Miles's brigade to the left of the plankroad. Captain Schwanded, but soon resumed command. There was also some cavalry fighting at the upper fords on Friday, but it did not amount, I think, to much. The wounded began to arrive here yesterday evening, and were being sent off all night last night to Gordonsville, where they will be properly cared for, it being impossible to provide for them here. You have, of course, heard of General Rosser capturing seventy wagons near Wilderness Tavern, fifteen miles above Fredericksburgh and five above Chancello
oint, and that our troops were fighting them about three miles from the town. Late last night, report stated that they had been repulsed, and had retired. The train which left this city yesterday morning, carried, as a passenger, General R. E. Lee, and for a while, those who feed upon rumors had it circulated that the train had been captured, and General Lee made prisoner. For this, however, there was no foundation, as information had been received of the safe arrival of the train at Gordonsville. Some uneasiness was felt in the early part of the evening, for the safety of the down passenger-train, due here at seven o'clock, but it was ascertained later in the night that it, too, was safe. Richmond, March 2, 1864. The raid of the enemy, so sudden and unexpected, has so completely interrupted telegraphic communication that little is known of the damage inflicted by them on the Virginia Central Railroad; but what little we have been able to ascertain leads to the belief that th