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Document Max. Freq Min. Freq
John Esten Cooke, Wearing of the Gray: Being Personal Portraits, Scenes, and Adventures of War. 56 0 Browse Search
Rebellion Record: a Diary of American Events: Documents and Narratives, Volume 3. (ed. Frank Moore) 54 2 Browse Search
Benson J. Lossing, Pictorial Field Book of the Civil War. Volume 2. 44 0 Browse Search
Elias Nason, McClellan's Own Story: the war for the union, the soldiers who fought it, the civilians who directed it, and his relations to them. 44 0 Browse Search
Frederick H. Dyer, Compendium of the War of the Rebellion: Battles 42 0 Browse Search
Alfred Roman, The military operations of General Beauregard in the war between the states, 1861 to 1865 36 0 Browse Search
Robert Stiles, Four years under Marse Robert 35 1 Browse Search
Horace Greeley, The American Conflict: A History of the Great Rebellion in the United States of America, 1860-65: its Causes, Incidents, and Results: Intended to exhibit especially its moral and political phases with the drift and progress of American opinion respecting human slavery from 1776 to the close of the War for the Union. Volume I. 30 0 Browse Search
Rebellion Record: a Diary of American Events: Documents and Narratives, Volume 9. (ed. Frank Moore) 28 0 Browse Search
Robert Underwood Johnson, Clarence Clough Buell, Battles and Leaders of the Civil War: Volume 2. 26 0 Browse Search
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Browsing named entities in Rebellion Record: a Diary of American Events: Documents and Narratives, Volume 2. (ed. Frank Moore). You can also browse the collection for Leesburg (Virginia, United States) or search for Leesburg (Virginia, United States) in all documents.

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bandoning a large amount of arms, ammunitions, knapsacks, and baggage. The ground was strewed for miles with those killed, and the farm-houses and the ground around were filled with wounded. Pursuit was continued along several routes towards Leesburg and Centreville, until darkness covered the fugitives. We have captured several field-batteries, stands of arms, and Union and State flags. Many prisoners have been taker. Too high praise cannot be bestowed, whether for the skill of the princto the action. The total force under Gen. McDowell was over 50,000, but 35,000 will probably cover the entire force in action at the Stone Bridge. Of the pursuit, already the particulars are known. Suffice it to say, we followed them on the Leesburg road and on the Centreville road as far as Centreville and Fairfax. The poor wretches dropped their guns, their knapsacks, their blankets, and every thing they had — they fell on their knees and prayed for mercy. They received it — Southerners
ng blackberries and strayed away from our camp. He then said, Are you the regiment that is waiting for artillery? I replied, The same. Then, boys, said he, you are stationed at Ball's Mill, three miles from here, [pointing in the direction of Leesburg,] halfway from here to Leesburg. He then said, Were you in the fight Sunday? Yes. I am glad, boys, you escaped from the slaughter. These d-----d Yankees, I would like to see every man of them strung up; I never could bear them. I will send Leesburg. He then said, Were you in the fight Sunday? Yes. I am glad, boys, you escaped from the slaughter. These d-----d Yankees, I would like to see every man of them strung up; I never could bear them. I will send Edward to show you the way to the main road. We thanked him and left. At 5 P. M. came to a railroad. I saw a little boy and girl, and asked them what road it was. They replied they did not know, but if we would go to the house Jeff. would tell us. After some further inquiries, without getting any information, we crossed the track and took to the woods, and continued our march until 6 P. M., when we saw a house standing alone in the bushes. We determined to go there, and get something to e
t if they had not, we would have gone to them. It is now reasonably certain that matters here were so matured that the military authorities were ready and determined to advance, and it was with a feeling of relief, perhaps, that the first booming of the cannon at McLean's Ford removed from us the responsibilities of that movement. We were not entirely prepared — as well prepared, at least, as we might have hoped to be. The forces of Gen. Holmes, from Fredericksburg, and of Gen. Evans, from Leesburg, were in the battle; and so, also, were the most of those from Gen. Johnston. But two brigades of Gen. Johnston's force--Gen. Smith's and Col. Elzey's — had not arrived. Hampton's Legion and Wynder's Sixth regiment of North Carolina had not arrived the night before. Many that had arrived from the sources mentioned above were without the provisions of a military life, and were too wearied for the most efficient military service; but still our forces had been greatly strengthened. At leas
Secession accounts of the fight. The Leesburg Democratic Mirror extra of July 19, says:--We have just learned that a sanguinary battle took place at Bull Run, near Manassas Junction, on yesterday, July 18, in which the enemy met with terrible loss. The following letter, from a perfectly reliable gentleman, was sent to us at seven o'clock this morning, July 19. We will endeavor to give to our friends from time to time the latest information from the scene of action. Two passengers, who also left the Junction yesterday evening, confirm the statements of our correspondent, and say that the victory was overwhelming: near Middleburg, July 19, 1861. I left Manassas Junction last night at sundown. Our troops had very severe fighting on Bull Run, about three miles distant from the Junction, nearly all day yesterday. The artillery was in full play from nine A. M. until between four and five P. M., with two or three intervals of about one hour each. The enemy's loss is though