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Thomas Wentworth Higginson, Massachusetts in the Army and Navy during the war of 1861-1865, vol. 1, Mass. officers and men who died. 299 299 Browse Search
Rebellion Record: a Diary of American Events: Documents and Narratives, Volume 5. (ed. Frank Moore) 215 1 Browse Search
An English Combatant, Lieutenant of Artillery of the Field Staff., Battlefields of the South from Bull Run to Fredericksburgh; with sketches of Confederate commanders, and gossip of the camps. 198 0 Browse Search
Frederick H. Dyer, Compendium of the War of the Rebellion: Regimental Histories 194 194 Browse Search
Robert Underwood Johnson, Clarence Clough Buell, Battles and Leaders of the Civil War: The Opening Battles. Volume 1. 139 1 Browse Search
John Esten Cooke, Wearing of the Gray: Being Personal Portraits, Scenes, and Adventures of War. 128 0 Browse Search
Robert Underwood Johnson, Clarence Clough Buell, Battles and Leaders of the Civil War: Volume 2. 120 0 Browse Search
Rebellion Record: a Diary of American Events: Documents and Narratives, Volume 9. (ed. Frank Moore) 98 0 Browse Search
Rebellion Record: a Diary of American Events: Documents and Narratives, Volume 2. (ed. Frank Moore) 88 4 Browse Search
William F. Fox, Lt. Col. U. S. V., Regimental Losses in the American Civil War, 1861-1865: A Treatise on the extent and nature of the mortuary losses in the Union regiments, with full and exhaustive statistics compiled from the official records on file in the state military bureaus and at Washington 75 73 Browse Search
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Browsing named entities in Robert Lewis Dabney, Life and Commands of Lieutenand- General Thomas J. Jackson. You can also browse the collection for Manassas, Va. (Virginia, United States) or search for Manassas, Va. (Virginia, United States) in all documents.

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ends in public life, has been in my hands, together with copies of all the important official papers on file in the War Department of the late Confederate Government. I have had the advantage of the fullest illustrations of the battle-fields and the theatre of war where General Jackson acted, from the topographical department of the same government, and from careful personal inspection: It was also my privilege to enjoy his friendship, although not under his orders, during the campaign of Manassas, in 1861; and to serve next his person, as chief of his Staff, during the memorable campaigns of the Valley and the Chickahominy, in 1862. So that I had personal knowledge of the events on which the structure of his military fame was first reared. My prime object has been to portray and vindicate his Christian character, that his countrymen may possess it as a precious example, and may honor that God in it, whom he so delighted to honor. It is for this purpose that the attempt was mad
Robert Lewis Dabney, Life and Commands of Lieutenand- General Thomas J. Jackson, Chapter 7: Manassas. (search)
Chapter 7: Manassas. The movement of General Johnston from Harper's Ferry to Winchester was dictated, not only by the cle army should be transported on successive trains to Manassas Junction by the morning of Saturday; but by a collision which piercing the centre of McDowell, with a fatal thrust, at Manassas, Patterson was haranguing his mutinous troops at Charlester those over me may decide, and I am content to be here (Manassas). The success of my cause is the earthly object near my hs six precious weeks had been wasted since the victory at Manassas, and the enemy had been allowed to recover from his panicent westward; that General Beauregard should be left near Manassas with his corps, to hold the enemy in check, supported, ifhe Minister of War rewarded General Jackson's services at Manassas with promotion to the rank of Major-General in the Provis bivouac, or the tented field; or on the bloody plains of Manassas, where you gained the well-deserved reputation of having
Robert Lewis Dabney, Life and Commands of Lieutenand- General Thomas J. Jackson, Chapter 9: General view of the campaigns of 1862. (search)
for eight months; and General Johnston was watching for the same juncture, to retire to a more interior line of defence. The goal of the Federal advance was, of course, to be Richmond; and to its capture, every movement was to converge. General McClellan was to drive back the left wing of the Confederate army at Winchester, by — the forces under Shields and Banks, to insulate and overpower the right wing resting on the Potomac at Evansport, and to surround and crush General Johnston at Manassas, or else to force him toward Richmond, and pursue him. The army on the Peninsula, setting out from Fortress Monroe, was to press back General Magruder, and assail the capital from the East. The forces in the Valley, having beaten General Jackson, were either to converge towards the rear of Manassa's Junction, by crossing the Blue Ridge, or else to march southwestward up that District, and at Staunton, meet a powerful force from the Northwest, which was preparing to advance from Wheeling, u