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Thomas Wentworth Higginson, Massachusetts in the Army and Navy during the war of 1861-1865, vol. 1, Mass. officers and men who died. 299 299 Browse Search
Rebellion Record: a Diary of American Events: Documents and Narratives, Volume 5. (ed. Frank Moore) 215 1 Browse Search
An English Combatant, Lieutenant of Artillery of the Field Staff., Battlefields of the South from Bull Run to Fredericksburgh; with sketches of Confederate commanders, and gossip of the camps. 198 0 Browse Search
Frederick H. Dyer, Compendium of the War of the Rebellion: Regimental Histories 194 194 Browse Search
Robert Underwood Johnson, Clarence Clough Buell, Battles and Leaders of the Civil War: The Opening Battles. Volume 1. 139 1 Browse Search
John Esten Cooke, Wearing of the Gray: Being Personal Portraits, Scenes, and Adventures of War. 128 0 Browse Search
Robert Underwood Johnson, Clarence Clough Buell, Battles and Leaders of the Civil War: Volume 2. 120 0 Browse Search
Rebellion Record: a Diary of American Events: Documents and Narratives, Volume 9. (ed. Frank Moore) 98 0 Browse Search
Rebellion Record: a Diary of American Events: Documents and Narratives, Volume 2. (ed. Frank Moore) 88 4 Browse Search
William F. Fox, Lt. Col. U. S. V., Regimental Losses in the American Civil War, 1861-1865: A Treatise on the extent and nature of the mortuary losses in the Union regiments, with full and exhaustive statistics compiled from the official records on file in the state military bureaus and at Washington 75 73 Browse Search
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Browsing named entities in Alfred Roman, The military operations of General Beauregard in the war between the states, 1861 to 1865. You can also browse the collection for Manassas, Va. (Virginia, United States) or search for Manassas, Va. (Virginia, United States) in all documents.

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her fate to that of the Southern Confederacy. One of the regiments of Bonham's brigade (Gregg's) had been sent in advance to Norfolk. Its mission was to take possession of the navy-yard and protect all public property there. This was a judicious movement. The many cannon and mortars, and the ammunition stored at Norfolk, were of the greatest value to the Confederacy, then almost entirely destitute of such important supplies. The whole brigade was soon afterwards concentrated at Manassas Junction, in the Department of Alexandria, or the Alexandria line, as it was also called, the command of which devolved upon General Bonham. He remained there until relieved, on the 1st of June, by General Beauregard. As soon as he could be spared from Charleston, General Beauregard made a thorough reconnoissance of the South Carolina coast, from Charleston to Port Royal. This he did at the special request of Governor Pickens, the object being the adoption of a system of defence to be car
e instance of Colonel Thomas Jordan, of the Virginia forces, who, in a carefully written memoir on the subject, had shown the importance of at once occupying Manassas Junction, to prevent its seizure, and the severance of communication by rail with the lower valley of Virginia. After a full interchange of views, which lasted sevford a strong defensive line. In fact, the ground on the Federal side of the run commanded, in most places, the ground occupied by the Confederates. Still, Manassas Junction, as a strategic point, was one of superior importance, as it secured communication with the valley of Virginia, and the army of the Shenandoah, under Generanment to establish a cartridge factory at Manassas, if certain necessary appliances were furnished him; which was not done. His letter to that effect, dated Manassas Junction, June 23d, contained the following passage: I must call the attention of the department to the great deficiency of my command in ammunition—not avera
, wrote the following letter to his friend, Senator Wigfall. It shows General Beauregard's unrelieved anxiety, and his determination, while wishing and laboring for a better state of things, to make the most of his limited means: Manassas Junction, Va., July 8th, 1861. Colonel Wigfall: My dear Colonel,—I believe we are about to be attacked by the enemy, who has been increasing his forces rapidly in the last few days. He has doubtless at present, on this side of the Potomac, at leald stake my reputation on the handsomest victory that could be hoped for. Yours very truly, G. T. Beauregard. The following letter, written a few days later, is also of particular interest: Headquarters army of the Potomac, Manassas Junction, July 11th, 1861. To His Excellency Jefferson Davis: Sir,— I have the honor to transmit herewith the Field Return of the army under my command, from which you will perceive the effective force at my disposition is as follows: Light A
nt of his mission. So great has become the historical value of this paper, that we present it in full to the reader: Headquarters army of the Potomac, Manassas, Va., July 16th, 1861. Brigadier-General Beauregard, Commanding Army of the Potomac: Sir,—In obedience to your order, I proceeded on Sunday last, 14th instant, tter of General Beauregard to General Johnston is submitted to the reader. It was written on the day before Colonel Chestnut was sent to Richmond. Manassas Junction, Va., July 13th, 1861. General J. E. Johnston: My dear General,—I write in haste. What a pity we cannot carry into effect the following plan of operationsearly as the 13th of June, to assent to General Beauregard's urgent request that authority should be given to concentrate our forces at the proper moment, at Manassas Junction; by again refusing, on the 15th of July, to allow him to execute his bold, offensive plans against the enemy, the certain result of which would have been the
noitre and determine the Confederate position and the best point for penetrating or turning it. This prolonged delay, though somewhat unaccountable, under the circumstances, was, certainly, of great advantage to General Beauregard. It allowed General Holmes to reach the theatre of operations in time, with 1265 infantry, 6 pieces of light artillery, and a company of cavalry of 90 men. General Johnston also arrived, about noon on the 20th, with Jackson's brigade, This brigade reached Manassas Junction the evening previous. So did, at a later hour, the 7th and 8th Georgia regiments. 2611 strong, a portion of Bee's and Bartow's brigades numbering 2732 bayonets, 300 of Stuart's cavalry, and Imboden's and Pendleton's batteries; to which were added Barksdale's 13th Mississippi regiment, which came up from Lynchburg; and Hampton's Legion, 600 strong. General Johnston was now the ranking officer at Manassas; nevertheless, as General Beauregard had already made all his plans and arrange
President handed General Beauregard the following graceful letter: Manassas, Va., July 21st, 1861. Sir,—Appreciating your services in the battle of Manahad acted as his volunteer aids in South Carolina and in Virginia. Manassas, Virginia, July 29th, 1861. My dear Colonels,—I send you, herewith, some import to the President dispenses with the necessity for further comment: Manassas, Va., August 10th, 1861. Dear Sir,—Your letter of the 4th instant has been rGeneral. We now give General Beauregard's answer to Colonel Myers: Manassas, Va., August 5th, 1861. Dear Colonel,—Your favor of the 1st has been receiveard to President Davis: Headquarters 1ST corps army of the Potomac, Manassas, Va., August 23d, 1861. To His Excellency, President Jefferson Davis, etc., etc. given to his Chief Commissary: Headquarters army of the Potomac, Manassas Junction, July 7th, 1861. Captain W. H. Fowle, Camp Pickens: Captain,—The g
ton's army with General Beauregard's was purposely postponed by him (the President) until that junction became opportune and thus secured the success by which it was attended. While writing these words, Mr. Davis had evidently lost sight of the telegram sent by General Cooper—it is needless to say by whose authority—which is given in full in the Appendix to Chapter VIII. of this work. For convenience, we copy it again, as follows: Richmond, July 19th, 1861. General Beauregard, Manassas, Va.: We have no intelligence from General Johnston. If the enemy in front of you has abandoned an immediate attack, and General Johnston has not moved, you had better withdraw the call upon him, so that he may be left to his full discretion. The italics are ours. All the troops arriving at Lynchburg are ordered to join you. From this place we will send as fast as transportation permits. The enemy is advised at Washington of the projected movement of Generals Johnston and Holmes, and
advising him that the enemy will attack in force the next morning. And the enemy did. The engagement of Bull Run was fought and won; and General McDowell, frustrated in this his attempt to carry our lines, fortunately for us, delayed his onward movement towards Richmond. Our success was announced to the War Department; what answer came back? The despatch has already been given, but it is necessary to lay it again before the reader. Richmond, July 19th, 1861. General Beauregard, Manassas, Va.: We have no intelligence from General Johnston. If the enemy in front of you has abandoned an immediate attack, and General Johnston has not moved, you had better withdraw the call upon him, so that he may be left to his full discretion. All the troops arriving at Lynchburg are ordered to join you. From this place we will send as fast as transportation permits. The enemy is advised at Washington of the projected movement of Generals Johnston and Holmes, and may vary his plans in co
dquarters Department of Alexandria, Va., Manassas Junction, June 16th, 1861. Sir,—* * * * * * *chmond, July 19th, 1861. Genl. Beauregard, Manassas, Va.: We have no intelligence from General t about 6 1/2 o'clock P. M.) Manassas Junction, Va., July 21st, 1861. Sent at 5 1/2 h. A. . T. Beauregard, etc., Manassas. Manassas, Va., Aug. 14th, 1861. Dear General,—In ordeadquarters 1ST corps army of the Potomac, Manassas, Va., Aug. 17th, 1861. Sir,—I have the hono Genl. Beauregard, Comdg., etc. Manassas, Va., August 27th, 1861. Capt.,—I desire thE. Johnston. Genl. Beauregard. Manassas, Va., Sept. 6th, 1861. Dear General,—I haveard. Genl. J. E. Johnston, Duncan's House, Manassas, Va. Duncan's House, Manassas, Va., Manassas, Va., Sept. 6th, 1861. Dear General,—I cannot perceive the advantage of placing ourselves so near theg with the Confederate army, in front of Manassas Junction, when the Confederate battle-flag was ad[6 m