hide Matching Documents

The documents where this entity occurs most often are shown below. Click on a document to open it.

Document Max. Freq Min. Freq
Maj. Jed. Hotchkiss, Confederate Military History, a library of Confederate States Military History: Volume 3, Virginia (ed. Clement Anselm Evans) 22 0 Browse Search
Judith White McGuire, Diary of a southern refugee during the war, by a lady of Virginia 20 0 Browse Search
Southern Historical Society Papers, Volume 2. (ed. Reverend J. William Jones) 16 0 Browse Search
Jubal Anderson Early, Ruth Hairston Early, Lieutenant General Jubal A. Early , C. S. A. 16 0 Browse Search
Frederick H. Dyer, Compendium of the War of the Rebellion: Regimental Histories 14 0 Browse Search
John Esten Cooke, Wearing of the Gray: Being Personal Portraits, Scenes, and Adventures of War. 14 0 Browse Search
Southern Historical Society Papers, Volume 37. (ed. Reverend J. William Jones) 12 0 Browse Search
Southern Historical Society Papers, Volume 23. (ed. Reverend J. William Jones) 10 0 Browse Search
Southern Historical Society Papers, Volume 10. (ed. Reverend J. William Jones) 6 0 Browse Search
Comte de Paris, History of the Civil War in America. Vol. 2. (ed. Henry Coppee , LL.D.) 6 0 Browse Search
View all matching documents...

Browsing named entities in Heros von Borcke, Memoirs of the Confederate War for Independence. You can also browse the collection for Millwood (Virginia, United States) or search for Millwood (Virginia, United States) in all documents.

Your search returned 1 result in 1 document section:

Heros von Borcke, Memoirs of the Confederate War for Independence, Chapter 12: (search)
. 4th November. The deep sleep which succeeded to the fatigues of the previous day had hardly fallen upon me, when I was aroused by the touch of Stuart's hand upon my shoulder. The General's wish was that I should bear him company, with several of our couriers and Dr Eliason, who was well acquainted with all the roads in the neighbouring county, to the headquarters of General Jackson, who had encamped about twelve miles off, on the opposite side of the Shenandoah, near the village of Millwood. The command of our cavalry had been temporarily transferred to Colonel Rosser, who had instructions to hold his position as long as possible, and to keep General Stuart informed by frequent messengers of the progress of the impending fight. A cold wind was blowing in our faces as we trotted through the village of Paris in the direction of the Shenandoah, and it was freezing hard when we reached the stream, about midnight, at a point where ordinarily it was easily fordable, but where w