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Thomas Wentworth Higginson, Massachusetts in the Army and Navy during the war of 1861-1865, vol. 1, Mass. officers and men who died. 108 0 Browse Search
Frederick H. Dyer, Compendium of the War of the Rebellion: Regimental Histories 88 0 Browse Search
Maj. Jed. Hotchkiss, Confederate Military History, a library of Confederate States Military History: Volume 3, Virginia (ed. Clement Anselm Evans) 32 0 Browse Search
Rebellion Record: a Diary of American Events: Documents and Narratives, Volume 11. (ed. Frank Moore) 20 0 Browse Search
Jubal Anderson Early, Ruth Hairston Early, Lieutenant General Jubal A. Early , C. S. A. 16 0 Browse Search
Southern Historical Society Papers, Volume 9. (ed. Reverend J. William Jones) 16 0 Browse Search
Comte de Paris, History of the Civil War in America. Vol. 3. (ed. Henry Coppee , LL.D.) 16 0 Browse Search
Southern Historical Society Papers, Volume 30. (ed. Reverend J. William Jones) 16 0 Browse Search
William F. Fox, Lt. Col. U. S. V., Regimental Losses in the American Civil War, 1861-1865: A Treatise on the extent and nature of the mortuary losses in the Union regiments, with full and exhaustive statistics compiled from the official records on file in the state military bureaus and at Washington 16 0 Browse Search
General Joseph E. Johnston, Narrative of Military Operations During the Civil War 14 0 Browse Search
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Browsing named entities in Southern Historical Society Papers, Volume 11. (ed. Reverend J. William Jones). You can also browse the collection for Piedmont, Va. (Virginia, United States) or search for Piedmont, Va. (Virginia, United States) in all documents.

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Southern Historical Society Papers, Volume 11. (ed. Reverend J. William Jones), General Beauregard's report of the battle of Drury's Bluff. (search)
instructed enough to descend from that bad eminence. Let me explain this first lesson. The Blue-Ridge, parallel to the great Valley road, is penetrated only at certain gaps, by roads practicable for armies. On the east of it lay the teeming Piedmont land, untouched by ravage as yet, and looking towards the capital and the main army of the Confederacy. This mountain, if Jackson chose to resort to it, was both his fastness and his base of operations; for the openings of its gaps offered him esville, and Lynchburg. Hunter ordered Crook to march on Staunton from the west, and moved towards the same point himself from the lower Shenandoah Valley. On June 5th Hunter, at the head of his column of 8,500 men, came up with W. E. Jones at Piedmont, some ten or twelve miles in advance of Staunton. Jones's mixed and not well-organized force of about 5,500 men was completely defeated, and Jones himself killed. Hunter next day entered Staunton, where Crook joined him with 10,000 men. The Fe
Southern Historical Society Papers, Volume 11. (ed. Reverend J. William Jones), Stonewall Jackson. (search)
great teacher, Jackson, which they desired to improve, because it was learned, as they sorely felt, at the cost of grevious stripes, and indignities worse than those of the dunceblock. But their teacher would show them again, that they were not yet instructed enough to descend from that bad eminence. Let me explain this first lesson. The Blue-Ridge, parallel to the great Valley road, is penetrated only at certain gaps, by roads practicable for armies. On the east of it lay the teeming Piedmont land, untouched by ravage as yet, and looking towards the capital and the main army of the Confederacy. This mountain, if Jackson chose to resort to it, was both his fastness and his base of operations; for the openings of its gaps offered him natural strongholds, unassailable by an enemy, with free communication at his rear for drawing supplies or for retreating. When Banks first pursued him up the Valley, he had turned aside at Harrisonburg to the eastward, and seated himself behind the
Southern Historical Society Papers, Volume 11. (ed. Reverend J. William Jones), The Shenandoah Valley in 1864, by George E. Pond—Campaigns of the civil war, XI. (search)
e necessity which prompted it was not less than that which forbade it. General Grant, when he learned of Sigel's defeat, had him removed promptly, and Hunter placed in command, and instructed the latter to renew the advance against Staunton, Charlottesville, and Lynchburg. Hunter ordered Crook to march on Staunton from the west, and moved towards the same point himself from the lower Shenandoah Valley. On June 5th Hunter, at the head of his column of 8,500 men, came up with W. E. Jones at Piedmont, some ten or twelve miles in advance of Staunton. Jones's mixed and not well-organized force of about 5,500 men was completely defeated, and Jones himself killed. Hunter next day entered Staunton, where Crook joined him with 10,000 men. The Federal army now had nothing that could oppose or seriously delay its progress, but Hunter, instead of moving on Charlottesville according to his instructions, marched to Lexington, (where he wasted some days in plundering the country), and thence (Jun